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11 hours ago, Mink ette said:

Thank you so much for putting this info up online, I followed Bob's guide and my washing machine is now working again! I made a step by step video for anyone finding the idea of pulling their washing machine apart daunting. It includes what tools you'll need and how to use them. (I got blocked by security by posting the YT link, so I'm trying again with spaces in the URL.)

Full instructions for Beko washer dryer pcb repair

Excellent video.

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Bob and friends, managed to revive 6 bekos now thanks to your excellent information.

Been out to another yday. unfortunately this has dreaded f11 error. Its the 2-pcb (atlas) specification, so just a motor inverter board on bottom left (looking from rear) and all other power/control on front c/p module.

Turns on, lets you select & start a prog, but no motor action. Interestingly enough, like other complaints for this fault, the induction motor is stiff and juddery if you turn by hand, even with machine unplugged from mains, yet if you disconnect the Inverter board from motor, motor is free as anything, its a arcelik motor (not askoll one) so no electronics on it, just 3phase windings. so im presuming even when unplugged from mains the power cap on inverter brd is discharging to motor causing judder

Does anyone have any experience of repairing the inverter brd rather than replacing it?

 

 

 

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Edited by gandh1
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3 hours ago, gandh1 said:

Hi Bob and friends, managed to revive 6 bekos now thanks to your excellent information.

Been out to another yday. unfortunately this has dreaded f11 error. Its the 2-pcb (atlas) specification, so just a motor inverter board on bottom left (looking from rear) and all other power/control on front c/p module.

Turns on, lets you select & start a prog, but no motor action. Interestingly enough, like other complaints for this fault, the induction motor is stiff and juddery if you turn by hand, even with machine unplugged from mains, yet if you disconnect the Inverter board from motor, motor is free as anything, its a arcelik motor (not askoll one) so no electronics on it, just 3phase windings. so im presuming even when unplugged from mains the power cap on inverter brd is discharging to motor causing judder

Does anyone have any experience of repairing the inverter brd rather than replacing it?

 

 

 

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Nice to see a service engineer working to component level (I assume thats what you are) and presumably passing on the savings. During my days as an electrician, my experience of 3 phase motors doing as you described was down to losing a phase, eg:- only getting 2 phases. They tended to hum quite loudly and rock back and forth. Not knowing exactly how the motor is controlled as it could be single phase, it could be PWM or as you say it could be 3 phase, I can only give you a pointer and would go for the power transistors/triacs/or thyristors depending on design. Assuming you have checked the brushes (if fitted) then that would be the best bet. Problem is identifying them as they could have their own component id printed on them, making identification near impossible. I have come across this before, nearly 30 years ago on German made industrila equipment. Good Luck

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I don’t know if you’ll see this, but I have only created this account to thank bob12241 for his advice regarding a Beko washer/dryer having no power, specifically regarding replacing the D7 diode.  I have literally no experience in electronics but I bought a cheap soldering kit and a diode (watched some YouTube videos as well) and now I have a washing machine that works.  

You are an absolute legend!

You saved me a lot of money that I don’t have.

You have my sincerest thanks,

Mike

 

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  • 1 month later...
  • Root Admin
7 hours ago, vrinkstay said:

Nice to see that people are seeing this and saving megabucks on what is possibly a design fault that is raking it in for Beko.

It may actually be the opposite, and likely costing Beko money. As most people need to pay an engineer, I suspect most people will scrap their washing machines because it’s too expensive to repair. Chances are they won’t buy another Beko. 

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello

I had the problem, when I plugged it in, it beeped then nothing. So after reading forums, I ordered a replacement PCB, I replaced that. Now I have the problem when it powers up, the display comes on, but it won't start, or cancel the program. The selector wheel has no effect. It's like its stuck on a program.

 

After reading more on this post about replacing D7 on the pcb. I did some tests and my D7 doesn't seem to be faulty. So I don't know what killed the main PCB in the first place. 

 

Any help will be much appreciated. I got washing stacking up :D

 

Regards

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Hi. Some pcbs have needed configuring after fitting, although if that was the case it should be mentioned on the spares site or with the pcb. 
 

Other than that double check all the connections. It’s rarely a good idea to buy a new pcb tbh. It’s just too much risk that it won’t fix it or there are complications. 

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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Just now, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Hi. Some pcbs have needed configuring after fitting, although if that was the case it should be mentioned on the spares site or with the pcb. 
 

Other than that double check all the connections. It’s rarely a good idea to buy a new pcb tbh. It’s just too much risk that it won’t fix it or there are complications. 

What do you mean about configuring? I can't see any jumpers, or switches that I can configure. 

 

What else can cause a fault on the PCB if D7 is testing ok? 

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Lots of them had to be configured as they used the same pcb for multiple models with differing functions. However, if there was no leaflet inside to that effect it probably doesn’t. 
 

If you had a dead washing machine with just the beeping and replaced the pcb and now the display comes on but still has a fault it would be reasonable to assume you have fixed the original fault but there’s some unknown reason why it still isn’t functioning properly. 
 

It could be connection faults, the wrong PCB fitted, a faulty PCB, or more than one fault. It’s a very difficult situation and one that’s very difficult to get help with. 
 

As an engineer, if I had a washing machine with certain symptoms and I replaced a pcb and those symptoms were fixed - but I still had a fault I would firstly take off all the connection plugs to the pcb and inspect every metal connection tab to make sure it wasn’t overly flattened or bent. 
 

If that didn’t work I would be pissed off and in a difficult situation. Ideally the next thing I’d do is try another pcb but that’s not possible. 

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On 18/08/2023 at 11:40, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Lots of them had to be configured as they used the same pcb for multiple models with differing functions. However, if there was no leaflet inside to that effect it probably doesn’t. 
 

If you had a dead washing machine with just the beeping and replaced the pcb and now the display comes on but still has a fault it would be reasonable to assume you have fixed the original fault but there’s some unknown reason why it still isn’t functioning properly. 
 

It could be connection faults, the wrong PCB fitted, a faulty PCB, or more than one fault. It’s a very difficult situation and one that’s very difficult to get help with. 
 

As an engineer, if I had a washing machine with certain symptoms and I replaced a pcb and those symptoms were fixed - but I still had a fault I would firstly take off all the connection plugs to the pcb and inspect every metal connection tab to make sure it wasn’t overly flattened or bent. 
 

If that didn’t work I would be pissed off and in a difficult situation. Ideally the next thing I’d do is try another pcb but that’s not possible. 

With the original fault. What happens if you replace D7, and the fault still happens. What is the next step to fixing it? 

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Hi Big Jon. The answer is in the quote you quoted. Connections faults, display module, needs a new PCB - or something unexpected and weird... It's not a fault you can fix yourself because you need to be able to try fitting parts to see if it fixes it. But it's just a bad idea to guess at parts that are expensive and not returnable, with no guarantee it will fix the problem.

With many parts, such as the heater, water valves, pump, and motor, you can use a continuity tester to test. And if a fault is detected, you can be 100%sure it requires replacing. But PCBs are one of the parts that can't be tested to see if they are faulty. You just have to fit a new one, and if it doesn't help, you refit the original and try something else. That is not an option if you don't have one to try without buying it. You can't fit one and send it back if it doesn't help.

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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3 hours ago, BigJon93 said:

With the original fault. What happens if you replace D7, and the fault still happens. What is the next step to fixing it? 

 

There's a post about a fault affecting the on button causing the same symptoms on the previous page that might be worth investigating - 

 

https://www.washerhelp.co.uk/forums/topic/2662-beko-wdx8543130w-no-lights-on/page/9/#comment-16308

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Thanks MelS. This is the problem with a fault like this, it can be anything from the wall socket, the plug, mains cable, door lock, on/ off switch, control panel and PCB. You have to trace the live all the way through up to the PCB. 

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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6 hours ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Thanks MelS. This is the problem with a fault like this, it can be anything from the wall socket, the plug, mains cable, door lock, on/ off switch, control panel and PCB. You have to trace the live all the way through up to the PCB. 

I tend to fix my own appliances. As a DIYer, I'll also try to fix the PCB when it goes wrong. eg My current washing machine recently needed new relays (welding contacts, which is easy to diagnose since a  few taps will temporarily fix them), previous a failed mosfet which I tracked down by following the wiring and tracks, one before that the microcontroller was fritzed, so a replacement board was required, thankfully they came pre-programmed back then. 

Of course  it helps when you can find a copy of the service manual, a proper list of fault codes  and a repair guide for the machine. The ones for my current Zanussi are excellent with a colour photo of the PCB with the sections responsible for the various inputs and outputs marked out.

If one of my machines doesn't even power up, I would usually use a multimeter with the appliance unplugged, to check for an electrical connection between the live pin and the live connection to the board, and the same for neutral to avoid working on live mains. If the power switch is a low voltage momentary action push button,  I would also check it makes a circuit. 

If the board should be receiving power, I would try to trace where the DC outputs from the power supply  are on the board and work out how I can safely measure the voltages. 

If the switched mode power supply is faulty, that can be quite tricky to repair and I don't own an oscilloscope to see what's going wrong, could replace various parts,  except transformers which are not available as off the shelf parts.   If you can identify the SMPS controller chip, you can look for a datasheet with an example circuit diagram. No voltage could also be caused by a short somewhere else.

The D7 diode that people are replacing appears to be part of the switched mode power supply on the board, I think it is a rectifier diode for the DC output of the transformer 

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Yes, you can only normally repair PCBs if you have experience and skills in electronics. Even the most experienced white goods engineer doesn't repair PCBs because they have never been intended to be repaired by white goods manufacturers. Therefore, they don't release technical information about them, they don't make spare parts available, and they don't train engineers about them.

If there is just one small dry joint, or one faulty diode, the whole PCB is replaced, at great expense, and at undefendable waste. This is one of the things that must change in the future.

With over 40 years experience, I personally have only ever repaired half a dozen modules where I could see a dry joint or loose resister and used solder.

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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I am watching a great television show on UK TV PLAY / Yesterday channel at the moment called Retro Electro Workshop and he is based in Norwich. Its a really good fascinating show and Rob has a workshop where he repairs old TV's and radio's . He is old school and replaces capacitors and resisters and diodes on the main boards and has a workshop and shelves stacked with loads of electronic components - then he has this associate (or it could be his brother because they look similar) who repairs components on main boards of other electronic items the other day he was replacing some components in an old kenwood mixer/blender and an older washing machine - these are the kind of people I reckon out of the lot of them I would say if you sent a washing machine circuit board with faulty/burnt out components on they would be more hopeful of soldering and repairing them . Its worth a go , it would cost nothing to ask, and I would say it would cost a lot less than trying to get a complete main board for a washing machine or other white goods.
There workshop is at Millers Ln, Norwich NR3 3LU, United Kingdom and phone number is 044 1603 403524.
 

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I'm in the same boat, I think.

I have a WDR 7543121 but this same control board appears to be a whole bunch of WDR 75431xx models. Initially yesterday it was unresponsive, the power LED was pulsing slowly as if it was in standby so I power-cycled it and it was then completely dead. No beeps, nothing. 

I did some Googling and ended up here in the Bob12241 thread, so I dismantled the unit, pulled to control board and tested diodes in situ, most of the 1A 100V diodes are reading 600mv forward, but theD6 and D7 are reading 260mv; thinking this might be other parts in the circuit messing with the reading, I unsoldered both D6 and D7 and measured them on the desk - they're at 300mv and 260mv respectively - so not dead/shorted, but seemingly some weird forward voltages compared to the others which are in the more normal 400-800mv range.

I don't have those diodes so I've ordered some and reassembled the machine for the moment, but on reassembly it's all working, kind of. It came to life long enough to let me do a rinse and drain cycle, but when I pushed it back into place and tried to get a laundry load done, it beeped 6-7 times at power on instead of the usual double chirp, and now the front panel is powered but locked up and unresponsive. I've turned it off to see if an overnight rest changes anything, but - and I guess this question is to @bob12241 or any other qualified electricians - is there such a thing as an "almost failing diode" where it's blocking flow one way and allowing 0.3v or so through in the other direction?

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5 hours ago, Ziggy81 said:

I'm in the same boat, I think.

I have a WDR 7543121 but this same control board appears to be a whole bunch of WDR 75431xx models. Initially yesterday it was unresponsive, the power LED was pulsing slowly as if it was in standby so I power-cycled it and it was then completely dead. No beeps, nothing. 

I did some Googling and ended up here in the Bob12241 thread, so I dismantled the unit, pulled to control board and tested diodes in situ, most of the 1A 100V diodes are reading 600mv forward, but theD6 and D7 are reading 260mv; thinking this might be other parts in the circuit messing with the reading, I unsoldered both D6 and D7 and measured them on the desk - they're at 300mv and 260mv respectively - so not dead/shorted, but seemingly some weird forward voltages compared to the others which are in the more normal 400-800mv range.

 

 

My electronics knowledge is extremely limited to say the least, but Schottky diodes have a lower forward voltage drop than standard diodes, a schottky  diode is used to rectify the voltage on the secondary winding of a Switched Mode Power Supply.

 

At a guess there are two secondary windings on that one, one to power the microcontroller and electronics via D7, and the other to provide a higher voltage, maybe 12v, or whatever to power the relays etc via D6.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schottky_diode

 

Be careful when working on PCB with large capacitors on, they can hold charge for a while if there is not something in circuit to drain them, and the ones on the mains side charge up to 340v. Before messing with it, I would allow the board time to discharge and check they've discharged with a meter, or short them with a screwdriver just in case.

 

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Hi All, just trying to put a couple of things right here. BigJon93 , the replacement pcb has got to be for your model, there are at least a half dozen models that are using this type of pcb, visually they are all the same but the firmware programmed into the board is different and will not work if you get the wrong board, you cannot do anything with the wrong board except return it (hopefully) and get the right one. Ziggy81 if I read your post correctly you cannot test diodes in situ accurately without desoldering one leg as the readings can be affected by other components on the board and therefore can give false readings, I got false readings affecting D7 and D6 when in situ, so I desoldered them and got the correct readings, diodes normally fail or work there is little chance of an almost failing diode, I assume you have soldered the diode the right way round.  with regards to the other problem regarding no reponse from from the front panel, 12 months back mine did the same then the power button didn't respond occasionally, I replaced the front pcb and the power button worked but still no response from the selector switch. Please see my other post for a full description. Incidentally it is still doing the same thing but working (of sorts) LInk:   

BEKO WDR7543121W door switch or not door switch fault - UK Washing Machine Repair Questions - Washing machine Forum (washerhelp.co.uk)

Edited by bob12241
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11 hours ago, MelS said:

Be careful when working on PCB with large capacitors on, they can hold charge for a while if there is not something in circuit to drain them, and the ones on the mains side charge up to 340v. Before messing with it, I would allow the board time to discharge and check they've discharged with a meter

Yes indeed, I'm an appliance engineer with over 40 years experience and I wouldn't mess with things I know nothing about. I wouldn't do anything more than solder a dry joint, although to be fair if someone told me I could fix one by just replacing a resistor or diode I'd probably have a go.

But some of these PCBs can hold a big charge that would give a serious shock, Hotpoint in particular I've heard of. I think if you unplug for 10 mins it should be ok, but no one should be messing about with these if they don't know what they are doing.

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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On 27/08/2023 at 21:52, MelS said:

Be careful when working on PCB with large capacitors on.

On 28/08/2023 at 09:50, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

But some of these PCBs can hold a big charge that would give a serious shock.

Sage advice for those who don't know the risks of capacitors, you have no idea of knowing my technical level so appreciate that you're warning people to be careful. I've been replacing capacitors my entire adult life and always manually discharge and check they're drained before handling PCBs!

On 28/08/2023 at 09:10, bob12241 said:

Ziggy81 if I read your post correctly you cannot test diodes in situ accurately without desoldering one leg as the readings can be affected by other components on the board and therefore can give false readings.

I tested in situ first and saw readings of <300mv forwards, out of limits in reverse. Those seemed low to me so I completely desoldered and removed D6 and D7 to test them on the bench in isolation - where they still read the same <300mv forwards voltage. If @MelS is correct, then <300mv is perfectly normal for Schottkys and my D6 and D7 are both fine.

I think I have your issue with the front panel - I've previously had all the symptoms you described in that thread you linked, right down to it refusing to open the door despite being drained, and being dead after a front-panel 'crash' and power cycle that was fixed with a thump! I discovered this by accident - not by thumping it, but by heaving on the front as I rocked it out from under the counter - it suddenly sprang to life.

Can you remember where you sourced the front panel PCB from? For £60 it seems like a good idea to have one lying around as a backup before stocks dry up and vanish for these models altogether.

Also, thanks for your help in this thread; Whilst my D7 diode seems fine, it seems like you're a wealth of useful info on these Beko models and that's saved countless other people. For every one person who registers here to say thanks, there are probably ten more who just take your advice anonymously and run with it.

Edited by Ziggy81
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years ago I used to repair old black and white TV's (well replace glass valves and set up the picture with the horizontal and vertical pot's)  - some very big capacitors in them sets! - and you could get killovolts on the HT side ... even when plugged out . 

yeah have got a bite or 2 off the Hotpoint motor control boards before in the past

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19 hours ago, andyr12345 said:

years ago I used to repair old black and white TV's (well replace glass valves and set up the picture with the horizontal and vertical pot's)  - some very big capacitors in them sets! - and you could get killovolts on the HT side ... even when plugged out . 

yeah have got a bite or 2 off the Hotpoint motor control boards before in the past

I also used to do minor repairs on Tv's whilst working at a large multi chain hotel. These had soldered spring links which were thermal fuses, sometimes these would melt then trip the power to the TV. In order to work on them straight away and ensure they were discharged we would short the capacitors with a screwdriver, one loud crack and then they were safe.

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  • Root Admin

Aye and not holding the metal shaft 🤭

 

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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On 29/08/2023 at 13:30, Ziggy81 said:

 

Can you remember where you sourced the front panel PCB from? For £60 it seems like a good idea to have one lying around as a backup before stocks dry up and vanish for these models altogether

There are a few places, Bekospares, Ransom spares and espares to name a few. Just be sure it is for the right model. Just google beko (model) front pcb

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