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Excessive lint/dust on clothes after washing


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The big plastic thing is likely to be the condenser chamber. That’s usually the least affected by lint. So there’s a chance there’s a lot more lint in the fan chamber and inside the heating chamber. 
 

Let us know if it makes any difference. If it’s wet it stays where it is. If it totally dries out it could drop into the drum through the top of the door seal. 

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45 minutes ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

The big plastic thing is likely to be the condenser chamber. That’s usually the least affected by lint. So there’s a chance there’s a lot more lint in the fan chamber and inside the heating chamber. 
 

Let us know if it makes any difference. If it’s wet it stays where it is. If it totally dries out it could drop into the drum through the top of the door seal. 

Ahh okay, we fished out quite a bit of lint out of that plastic thing so I’m guessing there would be more lint further in the machine. We got the most we could out of it but it becomes quite narrow and hard to access. 
 

So is it a good idea to dry the lint out? And then that would be eliminating it? If so I will run the dryer tomorrow without anything in it and see if that changes anything. I’m trying to convince my OH to take a look inside again. 

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It’s probably already dried out. That’s why it would be dropping into the drum. The idea is that using the dryer will created a lot of steam that will dampen any lint stuck inside the dryer parts and stop it falling into the drum. 

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2 hours ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

It’s probably already dried out. That’s why it would be dropping into the drum. The idea is that using the dryer will created a lot of steam that will dampen any lint stuck inside the dryer parts and stop it falling into the drum. 

Oh okay, I get it, but is it becoming stuck in the machine somewhere do you think? Because the amount I got from inside was quite bad and I rarely ever have lint in the filter thing at the front. 

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It’s usually created only when drying. Any fluff that comes off during a wash cycle should get pumped away. 

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Hi Emma. I just realised if we didn’t have any wet laundry inside it may not have created the damp atmosphere inside the dryer parts. I’d try washing a load of cottons and then try drying them. 

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13 hours ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Hi Emma. I just realised if we didn’t have any wet laundry inside it may not have created the damp atmosphere inside the dryer parts. I’d try washing a load of cottons and then try drying them. 

I don’t have the dryer just normal washing machine 

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58 minutes ago, Emma Roberts said:

I don’t have the dryer just normal washing machine 

Emma I know it sounds silly but could I ask if you have carpets in your house and if so what type? My other theory was that the carpet was shedding excessively and somehow affecting the clothes. As my issue only really started becoming noticeable after having new carpet fitted. 

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This is a very frustrating problem clearly. And at least three people can't get rid of it. I just re-read the whole of this thread again. It's a struggle to think of any possible cause that would link all three cases. At least one of them is not a washer dryer, and a washer dryer can cause dry fluff and dust to drop into the drum especially if it is not used very frequently. 

At least one of them has had the same problem in two different houses, and with at least two different washing machines, so all of the evidence implies that there is no fault on the washing machines.

That just leaves two possibilities. That the washing machines are being used in a particular way that allows this problem to occur, or that the fluff and lint is not coming from the washing machine or laundry at all.

I just going to go over my thoughts again and spell everything out as best as I can. I hope no one takes this as being patronising. I just want to try and summarise my advice so far.

I would expect that even if the lint and fluff was getting onto the laundry from an external source then a washing machine should be able to get rid of it as long as it is being used a hundred percent correctly. Some washing machines are actually not very good at washing. Which? often give very poor scores to washing machines because they are rubbish at washing. So it's possible that if someone has a particularly difficult problem and they have a washing machine that is not very good at washing it may not be able to cope with it.

So one thing I would suggest is that anybody with this problem have a good look at Which? washing machine reviews to see if it has been tested by them and what results it got. If you are not a which member and you are suffering with this issue please post your washing machines brand and model number and I can have a look to see if there is a review available which may or may not be useful.

So as I said before a few times, anyone with this problem should ensure that they are not overloading the drum, and by that I don't mean either putting anything in. On the contrary laundry doesn't get washed is clean if there isn't enough laundry in the drum to be constantly rubbing against each other. So drum needs to be filled reasonably full in order to be economical and efficient. When I say overloading I am referring to negligently overloading. That is cramming the drum so full that the whole of the laundry just revolves in one big lump. There needs to be space inside the drum so that when the drum turns, and the laundry is taken to the top of the drum it can fall from the top. I've posted a link to a much more detailed explanation on loading the drum at least twice previously in this thread.

After overloading, it's essential to be putting the laundry on the proper wash cycle that is indicated on the wash labels and not to engage any options that cut down the wash time. So for example if they are cottons and the label says to wash it 40° cotton cycle then that's the cycle it should be washed on. Even if this cycle takes two or three hours it should be stuck to.

The wash cycles these days do take a long time because of restrictions in the amount of water and energy that modern washing machines are expected to use. In order to compensate for being more environmentally friendly they have to wash for much longer periods of time to get the same results. They do have quick wash programs and options but essentially they are next to useless unless you are putting something in there that is virtually clean anyway.

So any options that cut down the amount of time taken will compromise the wash result. It may be perfectly okay for many people but if you have got a specific issue with laundry not coming out of the washing machine totally clean and covered in lint and dust you need the washing machine to work as hard as possible

Then finally we have the detergent. Make sure that you use a good quality powder detergent. My wife uses surf and has done for years. But again, try checking on Which? reviews. They also review lots of detergents and test them thoroughly (why subscribe to Which?)

At the end of the day this problem is either something to do with the washing machines (either some weird fault or the way that they are being used) or not. So it's essential to eliminate the way they are being used as part of the process of getting to the bottom of it. If you try everything I've suggested and still have the problem then at least you have completely eliminated several of the possible causes but hopefully you might find it makes a difference.

A final suggestion would be that if you have family or close friends that do not have this problem maybe it might be possible to have them wash something a few times consecutively to see if the issue remains or disappears? 

 

 

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20 hours ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

This is a very frustrating problem clearly. And at least three people can't get rid of it. I just re-read the whole of this thread again. It's a struggle to think of any possible cause that would link all three cases. At least one of them is not a washer dryer, and a washer dryer can cause dry fluff and dust to drop into the drum especially if it is not used very frequently. 

At least one of them has had the same problem in two different houses, and with at least two different washing machines, so all of the evidence implies that there is no fault on the washing machines.

That just leaves two possibilities. That the washing machines are being used in a particular way that allows this problem to occur, or that the fluff and lint is not coming from the washing machine or laundry at all.

I just going to go over my thoughts again and spell everything out as best as I can. I hope no one takes this as being patronising. I just want to try and summarise my advice so far.

I would expect that even if the lint and fluff was getting onto the laundry from an external source then a washing machine should be able to get rid of it as long as it is being used a hundred percent correctly. Some washing machines are actually not very good at washing. Which? often give very poor scores to washing machines because they are rubbish at washing. So it's possible that if someone has a particularly difficult problem and they have a washing machine that is not very good at washing it may not be able to cope with it.

So one thing I would suggest is that anybody with this problem have a good look at Which? washing machine reviews to see if it has been tested by them and what results it got. If you are not a which member and you are suffering with this issue please post your washing machines brand and model number and I can have a look to see if there is a review available which may or may not be useful.

So as I said before a few times, anyone with this problem should ensure that they are not overloading the drum, and by that I don't mean either putting anything in. On the contrary laundry doesn't get washed is clean if there isn't enough laundry in the drum to be constantly rubbing against each other. So drum needs to be filled reasonably full in order to be economical and efficient. When I say overloading I am referring to negligently overloading. That is cramming the drum so full that the whole of the laundry just revolves in one big lump. There needs to be space inside the drum so that when the drum turns, and the laundry is taken to the top of the drum it can fall from the top. I've posted a link to a much more detailed explanation on loading the drum at least twice previously in this thread.

After overloading, it's essential to be putting the laundry on the proper wash cycle that is indicated on the wash labels and not to engage any options that cut down the wash time. So for example if they are cottons and the label says to wash it 40° cotton cycle then that's the cycle it should be washed on. Even if this cycle takes two or three hours it should be stuck to.

The wash cycles these days do take a long time because of restrictions in the amount of water and energy that modern washing machines are expected to use. In order to compensate for being more environmentally friendly they have to wash for much longer periods of time to get the same results. They do have quick wash programs and options but essentially they are next to useless unless you are putting something in there that is virtually clean anyway.

So any options that cut down the amount of time taken will compromise the wash result. It may be perfectly okay for many people but if you have got a specific issue with laundry not coming out of the washing machine totally clean and covered in lint and dust you need the washing machine to work as hard as possible

Then finally we have the detergent. Make sure that you use a good quality powder detergent. My wife uses surf and has done for years. But again, try checking on Which? reviews. They also review lots of detergents and test them thoroughly (why subscribe to Which?)

At the end of the day this problem is either something to do with the washing machines (either some weird fault or the way that they are being used) or not. So it's essential to eliminate the way they are being used as part of the process of getting to the bottom of it. If you try everything I've suggested and still have the problem then at least you have completely eliminated several of the possible causes but hopefully you might find it makes a difference.

A final suggestion would be that if you have family or close friends that do not have this problem maybe it might be possible to have them wash something a few times consecutively to see if the issue remains or disappears? 

 

 

So I had a new baby clothes which I didn’t want to get dusty, there were mixed cottons synthetic etc so washed them in my mums washing machine and they came out dusty but my mum washed them so I don’t know what she uses. Now the lint has stayed in her washing machine. I find new clothing comes out even worse. My problem has remained the same with your tips. 

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19 minutes ago, Emma Roberts said:

washed them in my mums washing machine and they came out dusty

Hi Emma. That indicates the issue is unrelated to washing machines at all. The lint must be getting onto the clothes in your house or an environment you use somehow. If the problem is the same in different washing machines - one even in a different house it can't be the washing machine. 

All my tips about using the washing machine are still relevant because they relate to washing your laundry as thoroughly as possible - which with an issue like yours is doubly important. However, it seems that even washing "properly" this substance is managing to evade being washed out properly, which is bizarre.

 

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13 minutes ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Hi Emma. That indicates the issue is unrelated to washing machines at all. The lint must be getting onto the clothes in your house or an environment you use somehow. If the problem is the same in different washing machines - one even in a different house it can't be the washing machine. 

All my tips about using the washing machine are still relevant because they relate to washing your laundry as thoroughly as possible - which with an issue like yours is doubly important. However, it seems that even washing "properly" this substance is managing to evade being washed out properly, which is bizarre.

 

Sorry I did include a white muslin which wasn’t new. It’s highly embarrassing and I hate leaving the house. 

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Currently this is how my washing is leaving my machine wet, absolutely covered in white fibres, and when they are dry the slightest movements creates a massive cloud of fibres. I’m forever dusting, I’m worried about my children breathing all of this in. 
I’ve tried everything you suggested, I’m using the longer setting, 40 degree wash, I use surf powder, I’ve tried to dry the lint out of the machine with the dryer on. And this is still how they’re coming out. I think it’s got to the carpet right? But I’m thinking surely the machine should be getting rid of this excess lint? If it is from the carpet?

 

This is my washer model number. 

003630DA-E79B-4114-A282-E6392C6E54B3.jpeg

621A357A-6BE8-412E-858C-6D63F50534E3.jpeg

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19 minutes ago, Louise1305 said:

Currently this is how my washing is leaving my machine wet, absolutely covered in white fibres, and when they are dry the slightest movements creates a massive cloud of fibres. I’m forever dusting, I’m worried about my children breathing all of this in. 
I’ve tried everything you suggested, I’m using the longer setting, 40 degree wash, I use surf powder, I’ve tried to dry the lint out of the machine with the dryer on. And this is still how they’re coming out. I think it’s got to the carpet right? But I’m thinking surely the machine should be getting rid of this excess lint? If it is from the carpet?

 

 

Hello Louise. When you say the washing is wet do you mean it's not spun properly? Also is the carpet white, the same as the white fibres?

Is the carpet new? Is it man made fibre subject to static electricity? I'm wondering if somehow the fibres are electrically charged and sticking to the laundry.

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8 minutes ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Hello Louise. When you say the washing is wet do you mean it's not spun properly? Also is the carpet white, the same as the white fibres?

Is the carpet new? Is it man made fibre subject to static electricity? I'm wondering if somehow the fibres are electrically charged and sticking to the laundry.

Hi Andy, no I mean just damp out of the machine before drying. But this is the surface of the clothes as soon as they come out of the machine. And then when they dry the fibres fly everywhere. 
The fibres on the surface of the clothes do seem quite wirey like wool. The carpet is a mixture of greys and it is a wool loop style carpet, I’m not sure what kind of fibres it is whether is it man made, I assume so? 
I do find it sheds quite a lot, when I vacuum it easily fills the Hoover with grey fluff but I didn’t know what was causing what. Is it the clothes causing the carpet to be dusty or the other way around. 
 

I had the carpet fitted in the summer of 2020 and to be honest I didn’t see a problem with my laundry before then, I had been using this washer without an issue since October 2018. 

 

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On 12/01/2022 at 13:53, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

This is a very frustrating problem clearly. And at least three people can't get rid of it. I just re-read the whole of this thread again. It's a struggle to think of any possible cause that would link all three cases. At least one of them is not a washer dryer, and a washer dryer can cause dry fluff and dust to drop into the drum especially if it is not used very frequently. 

At least one of them has had the same problem in two different houses, and with at least two different washing machines, so all of the evidence implies that there is no fault on the washing machines.

That just leaves two possibilities. That the washing machines are being used in a particular way that allows this problem to occur, or that the fluff and lint is not coming from the washing machine or laundry at all.

I just going to go over my thoughts again and spell everything out as best as I can. I hope no one takes this as being patronising. I just want to try and summarise my advice so far.

I would expect that even if the lint and fluff was getting onto the laundry from an external source then a washing machine should be able to get rid of it as long as it is being used a hundred percent correctly. Some washing machines are actually not very good at washing. Which? often give very poor scores to washing machines because they are rubbish at washing. So it's possible that if someone has a particularly difficult problem and they have a washing machine that is not very good at washing it may not be able to cope with it.

So one thing I would suggest is that anybody with this problem have a good look at Which? washing machine reviews to see if it has been tested by them and what results it got. If you are not a which member and you are suffering with this issue please post your washing machines brand and model number and I can have a look to see if there is a review available which may or may not be useful.

So as I said before a few times, anyone with this problem should ensure that they are not overloading the drum, and by that I don't mean either putting anything in. On the contrary laundry doesn't get washed is clean if there isn't enough laundry in the drum to be constantly rubbing against each other. So drum needs to be filled reasonably full in order to be economical and efficient. When I say overloading I am referring to negligently overloading. That is cramming the drum so full that the whole of the laundry just revolves in one big lump. There needs to be space inside the drum so that when the drum turns, and the laundry is taken to the top of the drum it can fall from the top. I've posted a link to a much more detailed explanation on loading the drum at least twice previously in this thread.

After overloading, it's essential to be putting the laundry on the proper wash cycle that is indicated on the wash labels and not to engage any options that cut down the wash time. So for example if they are cottons and the label says to wash it 40° cotton cycle then that's the cycle it should be washed on. Even if this cycle takes two or three hours it should be stuck to.

The wash cycles these days do take a long time because of restrictions in the amount of water and energy that modern washing machines are expected to use. In order to compensate for being more environmentally friendly they have to wash for much longer periods of time to get the same results. They do have quick wash programs and options but essentially they are next to useless unless you are putting something in there that is virtually clean anyway.

So any options that cut down the amount of time taken will compromise the wash result. It may be perfectly okay for many people but if you have got a specific issue with laundry not coming out of the washing machine totally clean and covered in lint and dust you need the washing machine to work as hard as possible

Then finally we have the detergent. Make sure that you use a good quality powder detergent. My wife uses surf and has done for years. But again, try checking on Which? reviews. They also review lots of detergents and test them thoroughly (why subscribe to Which?)

At the end of the day this problem is either something to do with the washing machines (either some weird fault or the way that they are being used) or not. So it's essential to eliminate the way they are being used as part of the process of getting to the bottom of it. If you try everything I've suggested and still have the problem then at least you have completely eliminated several of the possible causes but hopefully you might find it makes a difference.

A final suggestion would be that if you have family or close friends that do not have this problem maybe it might be possible to have them wash something a few times consecutively to see if the issue remains or disappears? 

 

 

The problem is still very much the same maybe even worse

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1 hour ago, Emma Roberts said:

The problem is still very much the same maybe even worse

Hi. What extra things have you tried and eliminated?

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5 hours ago, Emma Roberts said:

The problem is still very much the same maybe even worse

Hi Emma, could I ask if anything in the house could be causing the it through shedding? Because I have a suspicion that my issue is related to my carpet but I don’t want to replace it if it isn’t related to the problem. 

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On 12/01/2022 at 13:53, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

This is a very frustrating problem clearly. And at least three people can't get rid of it. I just re-read the whole of this thread again. It's a struggle to think of any possible cause that would link all three cases. At least one of them is not a washer dryer, and a washer dryer can cause dry fluff and dust to drop into the drum especially if it is not used very frequently. 

At least one of them has had the same problem in two different houses, and with at least two different washing machines, so all of the evidence implies that there is no fault on the washing machines.

That just leaves two possibilities. That the washing machines are being used in a particular way that allows this problem to occur, or that the fluff and lint is not coming from the washing machine or laundry at all.

I just going to go over my thoughts again and spell everything out as best as I can. I hope no one takes this as being patronising. I just want to try and summarise my advice so far.

I would expect that even if the lint and fluff was getting onto the laundry from an external source then a washing machine should be able to get rid of it as long as it is being used a hundred percent correctly. Some washing machines are actually not very good at washing. Which? often give very poor scores to washing machines because they are rubbish at washing. So it's possible that if someone has a particularly difficult problem and they have a washing machine that is not very good at washing it may not be able to cope with it.

So one thing I would suggest is that anybody with this problem have a good look at Which? washing machine reviews to see if it has been tested by them and what results it got. If you are not a which member and you are suffering with this issue please post your washing machines brand and model number and I can have a look to see if there is a review available which may or may not be useful.

So as I said before a few times, anyone with this problem should ensure that they are not overloading the drum, and by that I don't mean either putting anything in. On the contrary laundry doesn't get washed is clean if there isn't enough laundry in the drum to be constantly rubbing against each other. So drum needs to be filled reasonably full in order to be economical and efficient. When I say overloading I am referring to negligently overloading. That is cramming the drum so full that the whole of the laundry just revolves in one big lump. There needs to be space inside the drum so that when the drum turns, and the laundry is taken to the top of the drum it can fall from the top. I've posted a link to a much more detailed explanation on loading the drum at least twice previously in this thread.

After overloading, it's essential to be putting the laundry on the proper wash cycle that is indicated on the wash labels and not to engage any options that cut down the wash time. So for example if they are cottons and the label says to wash it 40° cotton cycle then that's the cycle it should be washed on. Even if this cycle takes two or three hours it should be stuck to.

The wash cycles these days do take a long time because of restrictions in the amount of water and energy that modern washing machines are expected to use. In order to compensate for being more environmentally friendly they have to wash for much longer periods of time to get the same results. They do have quick wash programs and options but essentially they are next to useless unless you are putting something in there that is virtually clean anyway.

So any options that cut down the amount of time taken will compromise the wash result. It may be perfectly okay for many people but if you have got a specific issue with laundry not coming out of the washing machine totally clean and covered in lint and dust you need the washing machine to work as hard as possible

Then finally we have the detergent. Make sure that you use a good quality powder detergent. My wife uses surf and has done for years. But again, try checking on Which? reviews. They also review lots of detergents and test them thoroughly (why subscribe to Which?)

At the end of the day this problem is either something to do with the washing machines (either some weird fault or the way that they are being used) or not. So it's essential to eliminate the way they are being used as part of the process of getting to the bottom of it. If you try everything I've suggested and still have the problem then at least you have completely eliminated several of the possible causes but hopefully you might find it makes a difference.

A final suggestion would be that if you have family or close friends that do not have this problem maybe it might be possible to have them wash something a few times consecutively to see if the issue remains or disappears? 

 

 

 

2 hours ago, Louise1305 said:

Hi Emma, could I ask if anything in the house could be causing the it through shedding? Because I have a suspicion that my issue is related to my carpet but I don’t want to replace it if it isn’t related to the problem. 

We’ve had new carpets last Christmas and in 2019 - what are the signs that it’s the carpet shedding? 

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6 hours ago, Whitegoodshelp (Andy) said:

Hi. What extra things have you tried and eliminated?

I’m currently washing the machine weekly, and the water pump filter, wiping the inside of the drum with a damp cloth after every wash. Tried washing 5 items at a time, cottons only etc. Using surf.  Not using anything at all, cold washes. Adding vinegar and soda. Tried tumble dryer the clothes after to see if it removes the dust/lint. 

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12 hours ago, Emma Roberts said:

 

We’ve had new carpets last Christmas and in 2019 - what are the signs that it’s the carpet shedding? 

What type of carpet is it please? I think it’s my carpet shedding because when I vacuum the carpet the canister is filled with grey fluff from the carpet and I vacuum every day and I get the same result. If I get to eye level with the carpet there are lots of scraggly bits sticking up. Mine is a wool loop style. 

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On 12/01/2022 at 11:29, Louise1305 said:

Emma I know it sounds silly but could I ask if you have carpets in your house and if so what type? My other theory was that the carpet was shedding excessively and somehow affecting the clothes. As my issue only really started becoming noticeable after having new carpet fitted. 

I Hoover every other day but my vacuum doesn’t fill up. I don’t know what type it is, just a grey one. 

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12 hours ago, Emma Roberts said:

I Hoover every other day but my vacuum doesn’t fill up. I don’t know what type it is, just a grey one. 

Oh okay, doesn’t sound like it’s the carpet then. Because. I get loads of grey fluff from my carpet daily. And my skirting boards are always covered in grey fibres but I didn’t know if it was the clothes causing it or the carpet. 
 

 

I just wish we had a solution because it’s really stressing me out daily, I’m sick of dusting daily, it’s an absolute nightmare.😭

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