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New Wave A2101 Won't Fill Or Spin


Curious

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My New Wave 2101 won't fill properly on a wash programme, only a small amount of water goes in. On a spin programme, the drum rotates at a low speed but never accelerates to a full spin speed. If I use the cancel button to halt one of these programmes, the pump runs for continuously (trying to empty the washing machine) then I get Error 1.

I've checked the water supply and inlet valves - seem OK. I've checked the water pump and the outlet pipes - again seem OK.

I suspect that the control logic 'thinks' that the machine is full of water, even though it isn't.

I think I've eliminated the pressure chamber and its pipe work - because the symptoms are the same when I pull the plastic pipe off the pressure switch. If I reconnect the plastic pipe to the pressure switch, and blow up the other end of the pipe, I can hear contacts operating in the switch. But I can't check the electrical side of the pressure switch, as I don't know which wire does what.

Any advice or assistance please?

(This web site has been a great help so far - keep up the good work!)

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  • Root Admin

It sounds like the pressure switch could be stuck at F1 position. If you blow up the pressure switch you should get 2 clicks up and then 2 clicks down when the air comes out. On some Hoover machines, there are 3 levels. (NOTE: on many pressure switches - especially these days - there should only be 1 click up and down)

If you suspect the pressure switch is jammed, try giving it a firm tap on the back with the handle of a screwdriver which often unjams it. Then try blowing up it again to see if it clicks more than before. (NOTE: This advice is given for the older Hoover pressure switches which had a metal back and could withstand a sharp whack)

If this works, it may cure it temporarily, but the fault could reoccur so the pressure switch should be replaced.

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Thanks for the advice ...

Tried blowing up the pressure switch - three clicks up and three clicks down. Tapped pressure switch a bit as well. Fault hasn't gone away.

I am now trying to trace the wiring, but it's v difficult. From the pressure switch, lots of wires disappear downwards towards the bottom front right corner of the machine - is this the control logic?

Any more advice appreciated

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  • Root Admin

Yes, that is the power module. The fault has to be related to the power module thinking the tub is still full of water when it clearly isn't. On Hoover New Wave washing machines, the F1 error you mention is a time out error on empty, which should only occur if the water hasn't drained away.

Normally, if the water has been pumped out OK but you get the F1 error, then the pressure switch telling the power module when the tub is empty must be stuck (caused by blocked pressure system) or faulty.

However -

  • If you get the same symptom with the tube pulled off the pressure switch, then this eliminates a blocked pressure system (this can be double checked by blowing down the pressure tubing (from the pressure switch end - with mains off to ensure it’s clear
  • If you are getting 3 clicks up and 3 down, then the switches appear to be working OK. It’s unusual for a pressure switch to go faulty on the Hoover New Wave washing machines, and if it does, it’s usually a switch welded together (stuck) caused by a poor contact which has been arcing over a period of time or a big short circuit. It is possible that a switch could appear to click on or off but not make an electrical contact inside

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Thanks for your last piece of advice - v useful.

I have now removed the pressure switch and checked it with a DVM - the contacts all appear to be operating correctly. My next step is to check the wiring. The connections to power module seem pretty inaccessible - any tips on reaching these, or do I have to take the module out (somehow)?

Edited by Curious
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  • Root Admin

The power module is inaccessible without taking the front off. It's easy enough to do though.

  • open the door and take of the plastic clamp band holding the door gasket on. (Just shove a small electrical screwdriver between it and the gasket and prize it off by sliding to the right and pulling away from the machine)
  • Peel off the door gasket from the shell of the machine
  • unscrew the 3 screws under the lip of the front panel at the bottom
  • The panel should then come away. Make absolutely sure the power is off as the main live goes to the switches behind the door interlock. Just move the panel to the side. (You can take off the interlock if it makes it easier)
Check the continuity between the contacts on the pressure switch and where they go to the power module. In particular, check the continuity between the wire on tag 12 of the pressure switch down to the power module. This is the switch that registers there is no water in the machine.

The power goes through 11 and 14 when the first level of water is registered (called F1) and when the water drains away, the spring-loaded switch clicks back to switch 12. If you get continuity from the wire on tag 12 of the pressure switch down to the power module then the power module must be getting the signal that the machine is empty. If so, and all other contacts and continuity tests check out - then unless there is a dry joint on the module, it would seem to be an internal fault.

Good luck, let me know what you find.

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Thanks again. Here's what I found:

There aren't any connections to tag 12 on the pressure switch - only to tags 11 and 14. When I had the pressure switch on the bench, I was able to confirm that 11 is connected to 12 when the pressure (= water level) is low, and 11 is connected to 14 when the pressure is high. Similarly for contacts 21, 22, 24, also 31, 32, 34.

So it seems to me that this machine works only on a "level is high" signal through tags 11 and 14. This signal is spuriously always true somewhere in the system, which is why the washing machine won't fill or spin. If the signal is spuriously true, then the fault is unlikely to be a poor or broken contact, as this would tend to give an open circuit.

I checked the continuity of the wiring from the pressure switch to the power module. It was all OK.

So I tentatively conclude that it's a fault in the power module. Given the age of the machine, is it worth persevering, or should I give up? (Mrs M says give up, and for once I'm tempted to agree with her.)

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  • Root Admin

If it's the power module, it has a RRP of over £230 which is ludicrous. However, according to my supplier's online system I can get it considerably cheaper than that. I could suply the part at considerably less than the RRP, but if for any reason it didn't cure the fault, it couldn't be returned. That's the way it works with supplying parts, the onus is on the person buying that they have diagnosed it correctly.

I have to agree that it seems pretty conclusive that due to the process of elimination the power module seems to be the only suspect left.

I sense you are the type of man that likes a challenge and doesn't give up easily :)

Have you removed and inspected the power module for dry joints?

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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Well thanks again for your reply.

I did have a look at the power module - no obvious dry joints or distressed components.

Thanks also for your offer of a replacement part. However, I think I'm going to give up. The cost of the part, and the risk of it not being the source of the trouble, seems too great to me.

However, in conclusion:

- You've been a great help,

- I know that it wasn't something trivial causing the problem,

- This is a really useful website, and I will recommend it to my friends.

Thanks again,

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  • Root Admin

It's certainly not anything trivial and I am 95% sure from your tests and eliminations that it is a faulty power module. If I'd have visited the machine myself I would have recommended you replace the washing machine rather than the power module.

If it had been anything other than the power module you'd have got it up and running easily by now.

Thanks for your comments

Need a repair or spare parts? 

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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