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jayj

AEG 7000 series frequently refuses to spin, leaving wet clothes

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Bought an AEG L7WBG741R washer/dryer just over a year ago, and it is not an exaggeration to say that 50% of the time it refuses to spin due to sensing an 'imbalanced load' (or so I assume, no indicator as such on the machine to tell you this). Have checked that the machine is level with a spirit level, it definitely is.

Having had a Miele (like the machines, dislike the company) before, when I first got the AEG machine I cheerfully threw in one pair of jeans and pressed Start, assuming that - like the Miele - the AEG could cope with a low load. Nope, machine drum bounced all over the place and jeans came out sopping wet.

However I find that even full loads only spin 50% of the time, meaning I have to open door, faff around trying to redistribute the soaking wet load, try a drain/spin again... only to find it has failed and so have to go through the same rigmarole again. Often I give up.

Like, today - put in a full load at 10am, which in theory should have finished by latest 2pm. Here we are at 3.30pm, and after 3 manual  'redistributions', the latest drain/spin cycle has ended... and the clothes are soaking and it is now dark and so not a great time to haul the stuff out and put on the line.

The L7WBG741R is a washer/dryer with the lowest weight allowance (7kg wash) of the series, and I noticed that the drum seems less deep than the larger weight models. Is it possible that this is a design fault i.e. the shallower drum is more prone to imbalance? Or could it be that the imbalance detector has been mounted wrongly or is over-sensitive?

Still in 2 year warranty, so any advice appreciated.

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Yes it’s a problem with modern washing machines and especially with large drum models. I wouldn’t recommend one unless you have great big loads to wash. Unfortunately many people get them because they like the idea of being able to fit big things in or they think they are more economical. But they are only economical if most washes are done with a big load in so that overall you do less cycles.

I have an article about the problem of washing machine not spinning small loads or single items with some advice.  


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Thanks Andy, and Happy New Year to you for continuing to provide this very useful forum by the way.

The Miele WT2780 washer/dryer I had (5kg wash load) could cope with a single tea towel and never went out of balance, so I'd love to know what they have inside their machines to stop the 'unbalanced load' syndrome.

The drum never bounced around at all. I know that the machines are heavier (the WT2780 was 100kg) and have very good suspension (independent shock absorbers rather than springs) plus of course no sealed drum.  I wonder if any other magical factor comes into play?

(BTW, did finally manage to get the darn thing to spin last night - took out two pillow protectors, drain/spun the other stuff, then put the two pillow protectors in with an already spun big towel.  Strange they don't show the palaver you have to go through in the glam ads!!)

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Whoops, went to read your 'Washing Machine won't spin' article after that reply - very eye-opening, a great explainer (and glad to see that it comes up top in Google searches).

As much as I found my experience with Miele washer-dryers frustrating (very expensive, temperamental electronics, and as one reviewer suggested 'over-engineered'), if I ever needed just a washing machine then they would be worth considering if only for the ability to wash small loads (assuming that lower priced models such as the WDB038WPS (£600) are built to the same internal mechanical standards as the pricier models).

(maybe not - just looked at reviews for this model on the JL website and this sounds fairly genuine: "The washer frequently reduces it's spin speed if it feels it is unbalanced - a good idea in theory but it does so really often (no matter how it is loaded) resulting in wet washing that then takes ages to dry." As does this from another reviewer: "Tends to want to jump about a bit more when spinning, but we've braced it. ".  And another: "The machine seems silent until the spin cycle kicks in the whole floor shakes and my plates are thrown off the worktop."  All a bit strange, as I checked the weight and it is 90kg, so nothing tinny. Wonder if they have altered the suspension?

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I wonder if some of these people have Miele washing machines on a sprung floor or otherwise less than ideal surface. Miele specifically say they are not suitable for spring floors. 

My Miele is in my garage on concrete floor and levelled. It is so still on spin that I can have a pile of boxes on top of it and they don’t move. We’ve also never had any trouble spinning laundry although we fill the drum when washing and it’s over 11 years old.  

All washing machines now have out of balance control. There are some loads, specifically small loads with some very light items and one very heavy (when wet), that would be impossible for any washing machine to balance. 

I think the cheaper washing machines have less sophisticated electronics, and flimsy suspensions so are more likely to be over cautious spinning OOB loads. A Miele should be more sophisticated and less worried about getting damaged by an OOB load. But it needs to be on solid floor. 


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Hi Andy, yes you might be right about the sprung (wooden?) floors. My Miele was on internal concrete floor and I could leave a pound coin standing on its side when spinning at max rev.

Talking of which, given those comments seemed to be from fairly reasonable people, it might be that they got zero advice from the sales or delivery people during purchase or installation. Unless you are one of those people who likes reading manuals cover to cover, I guess these mistakes are bound to happen for many owners.

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