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How To Wash A Duvet?

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I'm interested to learn how to wash a duvet, not a duvet cover. Previously I've washed my duvet in the bath-tub but it never seems to get it totally white. What's the best way to wash it? Is it possible to cram it into the washing machine and hope the water reduces its volume? Or simply use the bath-tub with washing powder?

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  • Root Admin

To wash a duvet you really need a large drum capacity. We have washed our king sized duvet perfectly OK in a 7kg drum washing machine (winter and summer duvets) We have recently replaced it with a 6kg capacity washing machine and it was such a tight squeeze we won't try it again. It did wash, but went round in one big lump and made squeaking noises as it caught on the door seal.

My experience is that a minimum of 7kg drum capacity is required for a king size duvet but the machine I used was a Dyson Contra rotating drum, which I now believe is larger than other washing machines claiming a 7Kg drum. To be on the safe side I should advise anyone for whom washing a king sized quilt is important may be better looking at an 8Kg drum or larger. There's a chance that you might just about get away with a double duvet in a 7 kg drum washing machine but I would not attempt to force a large duvet into an ordinary (5kg) washing machine. Single duvets may fair better but caution is needed ( Am I overloading my washing machine? ) Once wet, the duvet would shrink in size somewhat but if you have to force it in it's not likely to shrink enough.

If using biological detergent and washing one in the bath I would soak it for a good few hours. If washing a white duvet I would use normal detergent containing bleaching agents - not liquid or "colour-friendly" detergents and I would use hand hot water (unless wash instructions said otherwise).

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 years later...

I read when washing a duvet to use an non-biological power as the bleach will give a better clean and maybe kill a few more bacteria as a 40c wash is the max temp for most duvets, also it`s not going to affect the colour as it`s white anyway, if you use biological powder any un-rinsed enzymes may be left in the duvet, and maybe smell or whatever.

This might be total tosh, but it sounds good :rolleyes:

Edited by Tinderbox (UK)
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  • 3 years later...

Your pic looks more like a duvet cover than a duvet. I'm surprised you say you can get a king-size in a 7kg machine, as I just tried to put a single duvet in my 8kg AEG L75480WD and it only just gets in, it's pretty rammed. Will it wash safely if there's no spare space?

Also is the theory of the benefit of putting tennis balls in the dryer with your pillows true?

Is it also true you should only half fill the washer/dryer if you're drying?

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I take mine to the laundrette and use a hot wash. Commercial washing machines have no heat element, so a hot wash is whatever temp the hot tap water is in the building, usually between 50 and 70 degrees, which is fine for washing a duvet. I use bio powder as this contains both oxygen based bleaching agents and enzymes.

Not only is it far easier than trying to cram it into a domestic washer, but the laundrette dryers are enourmous, so you can have the whole thing washed and dried in about 2 hours.

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but the machine I used was a Dyson Contra rotating drum, which I now believe is larger than other washing machines claiming a 7Kg drum.

Those Dyson drums were enourmous! They were more like the drums found in 9kg LG washers. Look at the Dyson drum and then look at the supposed 7kg drum in a modern Hotpoint - the difference is astounding.

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The tennis ball theory does work. It stops things getting tangled and allows the hot air to blow through the items so that they are evenly dried.

Yes, the drying capacity of a washer/dryer is usually half the wash capacity.

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  • Root Admin

Sorry for the delay in replying. I've been unable to confirm if it's an actual duvet or just the cover as we can't remember. I too the photo about 9 years ago now. If it is a duvet it is clearly a thin one. As you've commented since this post though, the Dyson 7 Kg drum is probably a true 7 Kg drum but most other manufacturers use tricks to claim 7Kg when in fact they are smaller. I believe Miele are the only other one I know of to quote true drum sizes (and possibly the ISE10)

You are right that without space to fall into the machine won't wash an item properly. It sounds like the drum isn't big enough to cope with yours.

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  • 10 months later...

I've just washed a double duck down and feather duvet in my Miele using Biological detergent at 40 degrees. It was filthy, having been used by a student for a year.

I dried it on the clothes line, rotating it several times and shaking it well. I used a clothes prop to have the line as high as possible,and I chose a sunny day. I left it over the bannister that night and put it out again the next day.

it came out really fresh. So pleased I didn't throw it out.

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