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robert_h

10 Years Old And Still Going Strong

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hi there

found this site through money saving expert forums.

my almost 10 year old creda tumble dryer finally "died" on saturday. girlfriend reported the drum wasn't spinning. took the lid off, and the belt inside had snapped. bought a new one, fitted it (how difficult was that? so many screws and no indication of exactly the best way to get inside.). anyway, new belt in place, but the drum wasn't sitting properly. then i found the cause of the belt snapping. the rear of the drum has a rod sticking out that goes through the back of the unit, through a rubber gromit and washer on the other side. this had worn down completely and had finally snapped (the bit that came off looked like someone had had some fun with a lathe!). somehow the machine had continued to work with zero support of the drum from the rear side, and finally the belt gave up.

just bought a zanussi condenser to replace it. the principal reason for going condensed rather than vented is because i get fed up with sticking the hose out of the window, which is fine in dry weather but the house gets cold in winter. decided condenser was the best compromise.

anyway.

my bosch washing machine is about the same age. so 10 years old. and has never had a problem, though i vaguely recall getting the rubber seal replaced on the door, because that was leaking. so long ago i dont remember very well.

since then the occasional hairpin has found its way inside the pump chamber (if that's what it's called) but when that happened the first time i tracked down the problem and fixed it myself (much relief!). i think that's maybe 2 or 3 times ever.

so a near faultless track record for the bosch wff 2000.

with the tumble dryer giving up the ghost, i'm wondering if the bosch will go in sympathy.

so did i make an excellent buying choice all those years ago? and if i were to replace it, is another bosch the way forwards? i think the other makes i would consider are zanussi and bosch and aeg (and the john lewis "1202" looks interesting)

regards

robert

p.s. thanks for an informative site

Edited by robert_h

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Book washing machine & appliance repairs

Ransom Spares

Note: The links above are needed to help keep this site running, please consider using them.

Bosch washing machines are decent machines although many are quite cheap now and not exactly "quality", they are made by the same group that make Siemens but Siemens is the more expensive brand. Zanussi are the cheaper version of AEG which in turn are the cheaper version of Electrolux, all owned by Electrolux group. The current John Lewis washing machines are virtually Zanussi washing machines, although they have a 3 year guarantee.


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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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hi

my zanussi condensing dryer arrived at the weekend, good so far. was a bargain with all the july discount and egg money card cash back currently under offer with dixons online.

anyway, bosch still going strong, but i'm wondering is there mileage in using water softeners such as calgon? also i read somewhere about putting the machine through an empty cycle on a 90 degrees to give it a good "clean" (if that's the word).

any suggestions for ongoing maintenance / useage for eldery machines?

thanks, robert

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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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I bought a Hoover Softwave 11 years ago. It has broken down on five or six occasions with initially microswitches on door giving problems. These tend to overheat and the wires to them also harden up with the heat.They have failed in the open position and also have failed in closed position such that machine could work with door open. I replaced microswitches with exact replacements from Maplin (Honeywell make I think) but I don't think theyare up to the standard required and I have used other makes instead now Some money in the pump made a bit of a racket.

The timer started to play up with the machine doing everything but turning the drum. In fact it started to show this trait within a year or two from new although it didn't get too bad until year 5 whcih would still have been under parts warranty though I reckoned Mr Official lHoover man would want £60-£70 to change it anyway. Fortunately I found an abandoned machine at my council tip and scavenged a timer from it. This turned out to be a much higher spin speed though shaft and knob mean there is a slight gap around knob.

Since then I have acquired a couple of old machines as spares. The latest episode was a heater that went open circuit. Once again I was able to save money by scavenging from one of my old machines.

I usually give the lads at the council dump a few pounds for lifting the machine into the back of the car! I now have enough spares to keep the machine going for years.

These are simple constructrd machines and easily repaired. The Morris Minor of washing machines I would say. I usually check to see why the machines have been thrown out in the first placeand in the last couple of cases there was excessive lint in one pump and an elastic band in the other. I have yet to see one with a faulty bearing.

My only gripe about these machines is the fact that the plastic trim of the fascia , soap drawer and door starts to yellow.

Other than that they are grand machines and I like their straightforward construction. It's terrible that so many of these and many other washing machines are consigned to the scrapheap but when you can buy a new machine for less than £200, yu can see why many people buy new again. Furthermore why waste £60 per year on an insurance policy when after 5 years you could have saved more than the price of a new machine.

Anyway that is my rant over.

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Your washing machine has lasted as long as it has thanks to your dedication to repairing it and the amount of trouble you've been prepared to go to. Most people would have got rid of it ages ago :-)

The Hoover New Wave had a lot of trouble with the door micro switches and they quickly modified it to bypass the back micro switch. Also, the white plastic door latch that presses down the metal lever that operates the micro switches was a stupid design. The plastic quickly wears riding over the metal lever and gets grooved. It then doesn't press the switch down properly and allows arcing in the microswitch.

The ISE washing machine would be a good buy for you next time as it's dedicated to being easily and economically repairable. DIY repairers should get unprecedented support and even major repairs like drum bearings should be repairable. Most modern washing machines now are becoming less and less repairable with many even opting for sealed motors and drums that can't be repaired. There's even one where if an obstruction gets trapped inside (very common) you can't strip the drum out to get to it.


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Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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hi robert, like you i am trying to answer that question too!! i prefer to stick to our old bosch which i know is quality as opposed the newer and cheaper washing machines. does anyone know how easy it is to fix the newer washing machines or are they all computerised? everytime there has been a problem with the washing machine we have been able to fix it but our plumber tells us now that we should replace....

look forward to your thoughts.

neil

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Hello Neil. Most modern washing machines are designed to be unrepairable to varying degrees, which is a disgrace. It's all done in the name of cost cutting in order to make them cheaper to actually buy, but the result is that they commonly work out much more expensive than they ever were back when they were "expensive" because they don't last. Instead of paying a proper price for a washing machine and investing over the years in repairs to keep it going, the current model is to pay less than they otherwise would be to buy them and replace them every 4 - 7 years, which definitely costs more in the long run as well as being very bad for the environment.

Some of the worst examples are (not on every washing machine) -

Drum paddles, which used to cost several pounds to buy and could be replaced by the customer can now be un-replaceable because the screws holding them in place might be screwed in from the other side of the drum and the outer drum (tub) is sealed so you can't strip it down.

Many washing machines now can't have drum bearings replaced, you have to fit a complete outer drum half, or a complete outer drum

Motors that can't be stripped down to replace drum bearings, or the main armature

Parts such as PCB's motors, drums etc so expensively priced that no one in their right mind would have them replaced, so machines are scrapped due to being beyond economical repair even if they are only 2 years old in some cases.


Need an engineer, or to buy appliance spare parts? Please use my affiliate links to support this forum.

Book appliance engineer | Buy your appliance Spares 

Warning:  Read this before attempting any diy repairsNo representations or warranties are made (express or implied) as to the reliability, accuracy or completeness of advice. I can't be held liable for any loss arising directly or indirectly from the use of, or any action taken in reliance on, any information on this website, which is given free of charge and in good faith.

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