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  1. 1 point
    Thank you for the link, it was a very informative read!
  2. 1 point
    Hi, Many thanks for all your help. I obtained a 2nd hand control board and that has solved the problem!
  3. 1 point
    June 2019 I have this E80 code coming up on my Belling Washer Dryer. I have phone Belling and their customer service cannot fine anything about this code. As my machine is still under warranty (1 week over 1yr old, I have a 2yr warranty) they are sending out an engineer. I will re post when I know what the answer is, as there does not seem to be any answers on the web. This may help anyone else, including washing machine engineers. Thanks for this site, I have been here before.
  4. 1 point
    Yes and no. I drained it and cleaned the pump filter as best I could and lo! it worked. But only once. Then same problem started again and cleaning and draining didn't work a second time. Before that I did have an engineer out who tested lots, including testing the door lock thoroughly and it was completely fine. His conclusion was that the pcb wasn't receiving the message that the door was locked, so it refused to start and unlocked again. He tested bits of the pcb but couldn't see which component was the problem. Andy - I was hoping that it might be possible to just buy new relays or components and solder them on, or at least give that a try. It's such a waste of resources to have to ditch a whole machine which is otherwise perfectly fine for the sake of a few circuitry bits. Yet it doesn't make sense either to spend £300 on a circuit board when I can buy a Miele with warranty for £120 more. This site is a great resource - thank you for all your work running it!!
  5. 1 point
    I believe Beko have at least two models with this sort of feature
  6. 1 point
    I had the same problem. It took the best part of 3 hours to get out. I tried flat knives, flat blade screwdrivers, pliers, it wouldn't budge! What eventually cracked it was picking on the weak point at the hole where the thermostat slots in. I ended up using a serated knife to cut a line through where the thermostat hole is. I was eventually able to lever the end out using a screwdriver. Nightmare. Once it was out the size of the bulge on the inside edge of the rubber showed that thing was never coming out by trying to just tease around the edge. Phew! Don't fancy doing that again for a while!
  7. 1 point
    Thanks for your suggestion Andy.
  8. 1 point
    Thank you Andy, I will try that site
  9. 1 point
    Hi Andy and Andy, Yes, I've been bitten by live caps before. After all, they are little batteries. Keep one hand behind your back is good advice. There's no visible evidence of a problem with the caps, but they can still be duff. I did drain the water out, but not enough it seems. The piece of foam that sits behind the control board housing was wet, so water getting to the board is very likely, thought the board itself was dry when I took it out.
  10. 1 point
    Hi Andy, The blown resistor is on the power supply part of the circuit board. So the most likely candidate for the fault is the power supply. It's a switched mode supply and I'm told by those more knowledgeable than me that when they go down it's usually the caps that are at fault. I'm also told it's so common repair kits are sold that consist entirely of replacement caps. The resistor that blew tells me there's too much current going through that part of the circuit. That the replacement also blew tells me it's not the resistor so the caps will be the next line of enquiry, followed by the other usual suspects. I fully understand engineers shying away from messing with PCBs. Repairing them is a non starter with all the surface mounted parts and chips but most, if not all, of the power supply side is workable. A circuit diagram would help in tracing the circuit and identifying voltage test points. I take your point about the motor and heater, and will check these, but I can't see how these would cause excessive current draw through that part of the circuit where the blown resistor sits. The resistors, caps, diodes, transformer and the PWM chip are what controls the voltages and that, I think, is where where the fault lies. Of course, that fault could have fried other parts of the circuit before the resistor blew, but I won't know that until I get the power supply working - if I get it working. Water is the most likely cause, as you suggest. I put the machine it on its right side following a demonstration on youtube. Unfortunately the control board sits on the right side of the machine, which I didn't know at the time as I didn't need to take the top off the machine to get to the pump. Only later did I notice in the user manual that it's recommended to lay it on its back or front, so yes, water could have gotten inside the control board housing. What was initially a simple, quick, cost free fix, has turned into a time consuming nightmare that may yet cost hundreds to put right. All because it was laid down on the wrong side. Again, thanks for the advice and suggestions.
  11. 1 point
    Update: The black sooty deposit is just that - soot. Friend suggested it was from the bushes being attracted by the magnetism in the choke. I've cleaned it all off now. Checked a few parts and that blackened resistor next to the larger blue cap had gone open circuit. Replaced it but it blew with a puff of smoke when I switched back on. And now there's no lights on at all. Back to the drawing board. Any, and all, suggestions gratefully accepted. Wouldn't want to get an expensive new board, or a new machine, when it could just be a part that needs replacing.
  12. 1 point
    Hello. Instructions on how to remove a soap dispenser drawer for cleaning are usually in the instruction manual. If you don't have it you may be able to download one from here washing machine instruction manuals That's assuming it is meant to come out, but most should be. At the end of the day it shouldn't be difficult, there's just something at the back (possibly underneath the drawer) that stops it coming all the way out and a tab or device to press to allow it to come out. Some are even cruder that that and just need gently prising out.
  13. 1 point
    Carefully check all of the writing on the detergent packaging. Many modern detergents are designed to leave a perfumed fragrance even after the laundry has been rinsed. Apparently some people like it, but many people do not. Try to find a detergent that does not do this. I would start here Best washing detergent for sensitive skin. This is assuming that the problem is due to deliberate residues left by modern detergents. Which is not necessarily the case. An alternative theory would be that the washing machine just isn't rinsing the laundry efficiently. Make sure you are not selecting any eco-cycles or eco-buttons which may use a lot less water but be less efficient at rinsing. Make sure you are using the exact amount of detergent as described on the detergent box for your level of soiling, and hardness of water. If you are unsure how hard or soft your water as you can usually check quite easily online. Finally, make sure you are not overloading the washing machine which can trap detergent in folds and prevent efficient washing and rinsing. Hopefully some of that will help.
  14. 1 point
    I have same problem, Drilled the top of the donut shape not going all the way through to the inner frame and it came apart. Got a new hinge on order for £8. Will let you know how i get on in a couple of days.
  15. 1 point
    Thank you so much for the quick reply Andy! I found a hole in the door seal, so will get it replaced. Thanks again.
  16. 1 point
    Hello - yes, once a month every month I would (write it on your calendar) .. especially if most of the time you wash garments at 40c or under - some washing machines have a 'Auto-Clean' was programme cycle (I dont know if your particular model has) , but it will say in the instructions. It will fill up the drum with some water and heat it up to 90/95'c and then 'swish' the water around the drum very quickly as to 'scrub' the old gunky left behind undisolved detergent and grease and then at the end rinse it out. If you do a lot of low temperature washes have a try of adding some Dettol Laundry cleanser liquid to the wash cycle which will kill germs at under 40'c (allegedly) if you can get it where you live or something similar. - Dont forget to leave the door ajar after the wash and at all times if you can, it allows air to get into the drum and dry it out rather than leave it condensated and damp (which can lead to damp smell) and wipe the grey rubber door gasket dry after every wash and look for black mould on the grey door rubber gasket (sometimes if it already is bad with mould sometimes you cannot even get rid of it by cleaning and you have to have the rubber door gasket replaced or replace the machine altogether if the mould has really got in there and taken hold. Have you ever cleaned out the pump filter on your washing machine? - on most washing machines the pump filter is behind a door or facia at the bottom of the machine (the instruction booklet will say how to) sometimes if they are not cleaned they , over time, get full of gunk of undisolved washing liquid / conditioner, hair, fluff, coins and buttons, and sometimes if the filter is dirty and need cleaning a 'damp' smell can emulate from the machine, Come up from the pump filter and the smell then can come out through the drum and soap drawer. Talking of soap drawer do you take that out regularly and clean it ? most soap drawers can be removed totally from the washing machine by pushing a clip down at the rear of the soap drawer same time while pulling out the soap drawer. Clean all the undisolved washing powder and soap liquid and conditioner off the drawer insides and at the bottom of the soap drawer and rinse it well and then dry it totally before putting it back in place. Again a 'yucky' soap drawer attracts mould and can give off a pungent damp smell. - Good luck , I am sure you will eradicate it or make it smell better in the end if you do all of that .. well I hope anyway. EDIT: I have sourced the Instruction Manual for your washing machine here: https://www.manualslib.com/manual/46003/Electrolux-Ewg-12440-W.html?page=3#manual
  17. 1 point
    Just an update - I had the fan cover off yesterday and it was absolutely clogged with compacted lint. Pulled out as much, if not more than Iain's pictures above!! Quite alarming at how compacted it was between the blades. Also took the duct cover off as much as I could and it didn't look quite as bad but annoyingly the sensors triggered yesterday during a test run. This morning I had it apart yet again and cleaned up the duct (where the sensors are specifically) and also ran the "Fluff Clean" cycle on cold, which admittedly I had probably not ran anywhere near as often enough previously (knowing what I now know) AND ran an empty wash cycle with some washing machine cleaner in. It's currently drying 1/4 of what was on the wash cycle (decent sun today so most stuff went on the line). Fingers crossed, otherwise I'm kind of out of ideas. Unless triggering and resetting the sensors so much has made them prone to trigger more easily? Is that a thing? Perhaps running the Fluff Clean cycle more often is key to solving this? It doesn't stress in the manual that it's even necessary, only to run it when drying cycles aren't working as they should.
  18. 1 point
    Hello Andy, Thanks for your response and it was of great help. I ended up keeping my washing machine Regards, Vinay.
  19. 1 point
    Hi there Chris, Just joined the forums after reading your post, I'm willing to bet that you managed to fix up that old servis. I have one myself which i am offering if you want one for spares? You can have it free if you cover transport costs. Or you can pick up from Scotland. Regards, Dave.
  20. 1 point
    I just went ahead and took the weight off (I have done this 4 times in 1 week - so I am really fast in it now ) and fixed the spring in the right hook and MAGIC. It works perfectly. I can't thank you enough! Let me know if I can donate some money to the forum! Thanks a ton again Cheers Tathagat
  21. 1 point
    I THINK YOU GOT IT!!!! I have connected the right spring (the one with yellow marking) in the wrong slot. Sh*******T. I am lucky that it did not break! I confirmed it by looking at the video I followed to change the bearings. Right now a washing is running. As soon as it is done, I guess I will have to open the machine again, take down all the weights and then reattach it in the right slot. Or do you think I can do it (re-fit the spring) with care without opening everything up again? THANKS YOU SO MUCH!
  22. 1 point
    Ill be sure to check that. I tried using it again, the donkey sound has kinda mellowed down for some reason but the drum rotation looks kinda out of proportion, i have called a third party service to check the bearings like you said. ill let you know how it goes.
  23. 1 point
    Thanks. I did what you suggested. In case anyone else has the same question, there are no nuts on the back on the Bosch WAS24466GB. You can safely remove the screws and nothing drops inside.
  24. 1 point
    I'd disconnect from the mains and have a look inside with the back off and lid off first to check if the suspension and drum seems OK. Also, if the bearings had collapsed causing the door seal to catch I'd expect the washing machine to have been very noisy for some time before. they don't just collapse for no reason.
  25. 1 point
    Thanks Andy, so far we’ve tried emptying out & cleaning the filter at the bottom front of the machine, removing the waterproof system box from the tap,removing & cleaning the filter leading to the box & checked the tap. The bottom end of the hose doesn’t seem to come off...and there’s no separate back panel. The next wash started off fine, but then the inlet light started flashing again but I managed to finish it off by pouring water directly into the drawer!
  26. 1 point
    Thanks for the advice,
  27. 1 point
    Thanks for the advice Andy. I took another look before I read what you had written. I found that the top two bolts were still in place but the bottom two had fallen out. I did as you mentioned and removed the concrete block completely and discovered that the very bottom hole was completely closed up. Whether it had always been like that I could not say but I'm sure that when I replaced the bolts yesterday that it didn't go into the thread but down the side, that's why I thought the thread had gone when I was tightening it. I suspect that it could have come out of the factory that way. I've now opened up the hole on the drum casing and screwed it in properly. There's a little split to the one plastic hole just above the bottom one but the bolt screws in tight and the concrete block itself seems to be in very good condition. So it's all back together although I have not tested it yet. I was quite conscious about not over tightening as you say. Like you I have used a rachet until the end where I have switched to a screwdriver handle with less leverage for the final tightening. You mention that it may be an idea to replace the bolts themselves? The threads seem just fine on them, they have a washer but there's no locking part on these that I can see. Thanks, Matt
  28. 1 point
    Thank you, much appreciated. I've ordered the one you linked to. Thanks
  29. 1 point
    This pump comes up when I search 4Washerhelp spare parts for Indesit IWME126 - Indesit Drain Pump "Approved Spare" - it's £25
  30. 1 point
    Seems to have worked from my end. Hope you see it. Had to crop but I think you can still make out the mm on the rule + the info I sent before
  31. 1 point
    Great stuff Iain- many thanks for responding! I'll give that a go tomorrow! Steve Q
  32. 1 point
    Okay - thank you for your answer
  33. 1 point
    No problem Andy and thanks again. I'll open them up and see if it's anything obvious. Thanks
  34. 1 point
    Hi Andy, yes you might be right about the sprung (wooden?) floors. My Miele was on internal concrete floor and I could leave a pound coin standing on its side when spinning at max rev. Talking of which, given those comments seemed to be from fairly reasonable people, it might be that they got zero advice from the sales or delivery people during purchase or installation. Unless you are one of those people who likes reading manuals cover to cover, I guess these mistakes are bound to happen for many owners.
  35. 1 point
    Thanks Andy, and Happy New Year to you for continuing to provide this very useful forum by the way. The Miele WT2780 washer/dryer I had (5kg wash load) could cope with a single tea towel and never went out of balance, so I'd love to know what they have inside their machines to stop the 'unbalanced load' syndrome. The drum never bounced around at all. I know that the machines are heavier (the WT2780 was 100kg) and have very good suspension (independent shock absorbers rather than springs) plus of course no sealed drum. I wonder if any other magical factor comes into play? (BTW, did finally manage to get the darn thing to spin last night - took out two pillow protectors, drain/spun the other stuff, then put the two pillow protectors in with an already spun big towel. Strange they don't show the palaver you have to go through in the glam ads!!)
  36. 1 point
    Hi Andy, Just did another wash and it completed through all the way..really weird! Truly appreciate your help my friend, God Bless, Merry Xmas
  37. 1 point
    So I was in contact with QER tech over the last week exchanged few short messages about the symptoms . He suggested that the PCB is not at fault in his opinion and generally was reluctant for me to send the board to test, he pointed to pressure sensor fault or possible earth leakage. I mentioned that I replaced the sensor and blown in it to try create different pressure to what he replied that this can damage the modern sensor. I was confused whether I've blown into the replacement sensor I got yet before I installed it so I bought another new replacement which when fitted in didn't make any change to the behavior. I then decided to buy new wires to the sensor to replace the whole pressure sensor circuit for new as I though the machine stood in showcase property and what if it never worked for some silly error and because faulty it was placed there by developer. The wire arrived today and as soon as I compared it to one on the machine the new wire connector had different guides on it which corresponded with other port on PCB which was not occupied. I tried to plug it there disconnected the original and VOILA ! PROBLEM FIXED!! The sensor was plugged in wrong port on PCB hence it was not picking up the feed from the sensor and kept switching the flood protection on. I have done a wash and dry today and works perfectly. It would have been clear immediately if there was a wiring diagram available, as such I must say it got repaired by luck. I have no clue why the connector would have been placed in wrong port, if it was repaired for other fault and then wrongly assembled and written off, no idea. I wanted to thank you Andy, for your kind advice and guidance through the course of testing. I have never had washing machine opened before and with your help I was able to begin understand how such machine works in principal. THANK YOU!!!
  38. 1 point
    Oh yeah, for anyone else doing this repair, here’s a tip. Turn the drum a little before you fix the heater in. There’s a small clip inside where the heater goes that fixes the heater down away from the drum, but it’s easy to miss it. You’ll know if you’ve missed it as it makes an awful grating sound when the drum turns! Thankfully I noticed this before I’d tightned the circlips.
  39. 1 point
    An update, the new element is in and the electric is no longer tripping, yay! I found it quite hard fixing the new circlips. On the YouTube video he had a tool for it. I used a piece of cut off push fit pipe to hammer them down, which kinda worked. One fixed down tight straight away but the other was more fiddly and wouldn’t go down tight. In the end I resorted to carefully tapping around it with a screwdriver and hammer. So I got the machine back together with just the top to go on and I clumsily managed to brake the plastic clips off trying to work out how to put it on, ah man! Didn’t even use much effort and they just sheared off. Anyway the machine is working, so that’s the main thing. Probably just fix the clips with some sugru. Cheers for the help Andy and all the best.
  40. 1 point
    Hi the machine is fixed. We only took the back panel off. From the front panel where the tube should of been we put a wire through there to come out from the end of the machine. We then got the tube taped it up to the wire and pulled the wire from the front panel out slowly to get the tube out. I then put the plastic cap on.
  41. 1 point
    Thanks for the reply Andy, sorry I didn't see it before so have now changed my settings so I see replies immediately. I managed to get another board this week and fitted it this morning. This second board is behaving exactly the same. pump out fine, drying fine, put it on a wash cycle and after a minute error F-07 pops up and the dryer fan comes on. Only thing to do is switch off at the mains. As before only 140v at the water heater. So, either both replacement boards have the same problem, or something else is at fault. Hmm I decided to retest the water heater element again as I had read one situation where there was in internal short to earth. Zero continuity between live to earth and neutral to earth. Next I double checked the resistance on the heater element. Looks like it's gone open circuit now. Could I have damaged it when I removed / replaced to inspect it ? Could that throw the F-07 error code I see you stock them too https://www.4washerhelp.co.uk/hotpoint/wd640g-f031131/wash-element/product.pl?pid=2877679&path=495970:599890,52516:495973&refine=element&model_ref=519268
  42. 1 point
    Yes the main PCB, not the control panel. Exactly when does it produce the error? That may provide a clue. Put it on a 40 degree cottons wash and write down everything it does, and time everything up until the error. For example when the error triggers what exactly was it doing? Was it 10 mins into a wash and turning the drum back and forth, or was it 40 mins in and draining the water away? Could you hear the water heating up?
  43. 1 point
    Hello. Error codes implicating the temperature sensor (or NTC) often say things like, "NTC or module, check connections". The Hoover Nextra range uses, "NTC/Heater fault". So an error rarely implicates a specific part that is definitely the cause - which is a great shame. If it worked for a bit then failed I would very carefully check connections. There's always a possibility of a pcb fault, which I would advise against dealing with.
  44. 1 point
    Hi Andy Thank you very much for your reply. I agree, it does sound terrible! I've been trawling YouTube for videos of different noises a washing machine might make to see if any sounded similar, but none of them really did. I did try to spin the machine with the back off to see if the noise could be sparking, but couldn't get it to spin! I'll try everything you've suggested when I'm home from work. Thanks again!
  45. 1 point
    Fingers crossed. It is difficult to imagine what might go wrong with a modern pressure switch. The pressure switch has always been one of the most reliable parts in a washing machine. However, they are now a very different design to what they have historically been for probably over 50 years. As far as I'm aware they have a magnet that presumably gets raised up and down by air pressure inside the coil. An extremely simple device. The only thing that I would expect to go wrong with one is if by any chance the coil goes open circuit. I can't imagine anything going wrong with the magnet. Of course other issues such as a blocked pressure system, or an air leak can cause problems with the pressure switch function. If you still have problems by the chance make sure you check the continuity of connections from all of the pressure switch wires right back to where they connect to other parts in the machine if you haven't already.
  46. 1 point
    Did you blow down the pressure pipe the other way? Into the tub? A blockage at the other end can cause problems for sure. It can cause the washing machine to overfill. If a washing machine thinks it is overfilling, it will commonly energise the pump constantly trying to get rid of the excess water. It will keep the pump running until it receives the signal that the water has been pumped away. However, a fault in the pressure system, or a blockage in the pressure system can prevent that signal from ever occurring. Having said that, if there was a blocked pressure system then as soon as you remove the pressure tubing from the pressure switch the air pressure would be released and the pressure switch should switch off. This should stop the problems, at least until more water got into the washing in and caused the problem again. Another fault that can trigger the pump to be running constantly on some washing machines is believe it or not earth faults. If there is an earth fault on some washing machines they can behave bizarrely. So make sure that the washing machine is properly earthed. But more importantly you would really need to check that no parts on the washing machine have low insulation readings. This would require using a specialist meter though that tests with 500 V DC. Also it is common for faulty PCBs to show no visible problems. They can of course have dry joints, or blown parts, but many component failures will not have visible signs. So the lack of any signs doesn't prove anything when it comes to diagnosis.
  47. 1 point
    cheers andy, this looks very helpful, i'll see what i can do.
  48. 1 point
    Well I guess it's clear what happened here. Don't neglect your hot maintenance washes folks!! Glad I opted to replace the brushes too, compared against the replacement ones you can see they were about two thirds gone in four years - hopefully we'll get another four at least out of it now! Did a boil wash this morning to flush the crud out, all seemed to go OK - thanks all whose advice I found invaluable!
  49. 1 point
    Has it a removable soap dispenser drawer (most have) - I had a washing machine once , a second hand one , that had mould and dirt in the soap drawer. I (maybe ott) took the top off the washing machine and the soap dispenser on the left split/came a part (it wasnt glued or sealed) and when I split the dispenser box I could get right inside and clean it and even get to the big black rubber hose between the soap dispenser drawer and the drum - the whole area was black with mould and gunge I gave it, and its spray holes at the the top, and the drawer itself and good spray of dissolved soda crystals in warm water , put it in a sprayer and sprayed all around the soap dispenser box and down right into the rubber hose from the dispenser box to the drum, rinsed it all thouroughly with clean water in another spray bottle, emptied and cleaned out the pump filter at the bottom of the machine, washed the door gasket thoroughly then done a 90c long wash (was over 3 hours wash) with just water alone in the drum (no soap, no vinegar,) and after that the mildew smel had gone on future washes and no black marks on clothes - the washing machine lasted us for years. If you are going to take top of washing machine make sure you know what you are doing , unplug from wall and watch out for sharp metal edges inside the machine and dont touch anything electrical (even with the plug out of the wall capacitors inside the machine can hold electrical charge) - if you dont want to take top off machine and can remove the soap drawer (most come out by pulling it all the way and then press a little catch to pull the drawer right out) spray the soda crystal mixture all around the inside of the soap drawer compartment and at the bottom where the hose is and put the soap drawer itself in the sink to soak and get all the mildew/mould/soap powder scum off and rinse thouroughly and dry. What most people dont realise is that when you put a hot wash on in the drum to try and get rid of mould and the smell , that hot water goes around the drum and the door gasket but does not even reach the soap drawer nor the pipe between the soap drawer and drum and if these are mouldy or have soap scum residue , when you do a wash the water (especially if you have a strong cold mains water pressure) flows into the soap drawer compartment and the soap drawer and 'dislodges' flecks of mould and old soap scum and powder and that goes right into the drum. - hope this info helps and it might be worth a try before totally condemning the machine. - Good Luck!
  50. 1 point
    The problem continued so suspecting a faulty sensor I decided to order a replacement Temperature Limiter from Partsmaster for £33.29. I fitted this but after a couple of days the same problem reoccurred. It happened again today, so while I had the lid off for the umpteenth time to reset the limiter I decided to bite the bullet and dismantle all of the hot air extraction ducting and extraction fan housing. There were a few bits of fluff in the ducting itself but the extraction fan was another story, the gaps between all of the fan blades were clogged solid with fluff/lint, it is no wonder the sensor was tripping due to overheating as the fan will have been barely drawing any air in this state. After about an hours work with a pair of tweezers I had cleaned the fan out and had collected the dish full of fluff in the photo. I expect the drying performance of the machine to improve dramatically after this clean out, and presumably the temperature limiter trip problem should now be sorted.

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