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  1. Hi, probably too late now but our washing machine, same make and model did the exact same thing. I am a qualified electrician and spent some time working out the wiring as Beko won't give the diagrams to you. I found that the circuit board on the left hand side (when viewed from the rear) is the motor speed controller (inverter), this was ok as the fault was not related. The front PCB had no lights on, but if you looked carefully I occasionally noticed that the Blue selector switch Led's were lit but very dull. The circuit board at the rear RH side is the main power supply and distribution/controller board. I found I had 240v at the input to the board but couldn't find any voltages elsewhere. I took it out and did some tests, I found a diode had blown, after replacing this with an uprated diode everything was working. Total cost £2.05 with express delivery included. I have pics of the boards and location of the diode if required. Regards Rob Other models affected include WDW85140, WDIR7543101, and Blomberg BWD384W0 EDIT Picture of mainboard attached. Diode that had blown was D7 located just above and to the left of the transformer in at least 2 cases. Board is located at the rear on the bottom right hand side when viewed from the rear. Diode rated at 100v 1A, changed for 100v 2A, I chose a STPS2h100 as its size was the same.
    8 points
  2. Bob. You beauty. Another rescued machine, so therefore confirmation that it fixes this issue on the Beko WDIR7543101 integrated washer/dryer. I took the liberty of taking a series of photographs, and made a brief guide below. This is just my experience, and I'm not a qualified electrician / white goods repair man, so you follow this guide at your own risk! Cheers, Jon 1. Drag the machine out on some cardboard! Make sure to isolate and unplug the device from the mains, the water and the waste before undergoing any of this work. 2. Remove the 5 screws from the rear The black box is located here at the bottom right 3. Remove these two screws to loosen the box 4. A piece of sticky foam holds it down, so run a knife along it to separate. 5. Carefully jiggle the black box out and make sure you de-clip the cable holders from the machine (circled red below) to allow you to move the box. The front cover just slides off to reveal the board. 6. Now it's out, carefully unplug all connectors 7. Gently lever the board out of the black box # 8. Replace this diode (D7) - see Bobs recommendation. I personally used these. 9. Reverse all of the steps above, and turn on!
    4 points
  3. Hi there, just came to say that Rob's post above turned out to be exactly what was wrong with mine as well! My washer was only 2 years old and suddenly stopped turning on one day. First I thought it was completely dead but realised I could occasionally hear a very faint beep after plugging it in. A repairman came in and after 20 seconds of poking around with a multimeter at the back of the machine announced that 'the motherboard' was likely broken, wanted to charge me around £115 to fix it (parts + labour) He didn't spend much time diagnosing it so I think he just guessed which board was at fault. Now, Rob did actually update his post a while ago to add a photo of the board as well as further description, but from the comments here it sounds like some people didn't see it? So anyway here is some of the same info again. If you open the machine from the back, it's in the bottom-right corner near the floor, and is the part called "Beko WDX8543130W Pcb Main" on their spares site, should you want to replace the whole thing. The diode in question is D7 - my multimeter beeped when testing it but the others all seemed fine - funnily enough exactly the same diode shorting out for both of us - maybe Beko had a bad batch of them? I'm no electrician so I bought the same diode Rob mentioned: STPS2h100 which is a 100v 2A, the original one was 100v 1A. A soldering iron purchase & few youtube videos on how to replace components on a PCB, and I was able to (carefully) replace the damaged diode, put everything back together, and it's working again! Thanks Rob! Saved me £100, plus I learned a few things.
    3 points
  4. Hi, if I remember correctly, there are screws on the outside that have to be removed, directly behind the clips. Also it may have the wiring harness cable tied, cut these. Regards Rob
    2 points
  5. Well, finally managed to get the dryer part working again - though possibly helped by the fact I still have a couple of years of a 10-year warranty to go. (I've posted the history leading up to getting this repair elsewhere in this forum - First of all, I have to say that the Miele warranty repair admin seemed OK - in other words when I phoned them I got through pretty quickly, they found my warranty details and then made an appointment about 10 days away, then did text me the day before as a reminder. So, that part works. The phone was answered by a nice enough young kid - but he was clearly trained in how to push blame for any washer-dryer failure promptly back to the customer: After explaining symptoms (no fault code, but no hot air for dry/steam, horrible white gunge being put onto washing in drum during every other wash) he asked me "and are you aware of the Rinse Out Fluff feature?" Could have been my imagination, but the way it tripped off his tongue meant that he was well used to asking that question and getting a confused 'No?' from the owner (after all, the RoF feature is only mentioned in the middle of the lengthy manual, which probably half the customer base will never bother to read). "Yes", I said tartly, knowing what was going to be coming next. "Right... and have you remembered to use it AFTER EVERY DRYING CYCLE?!" - Again, the rising tone in his voice suggested that many of the poor s*ds who answered "Yes" to the first question might have made the mistake of answering "No" to this second question. I could have wasted a bit of time by reminding him that the language in the Manual regarding the RoF feature was not exactly apocalyptic: "Run the Rinse out fluff programme before the machine is used again so that fluff cannot be deposited on the next load (e.g. fluff from dark garments being deposited on lighter coloured items) or cause a blockage." And this just located on p.45 in the manual. (As we now know, for many Miele Washer/Dryer owners, the RoF feature should really be in red ink, with words along the lines of "Please remember that if you don't use the RoF function immediately after every single use of the drying function, your £2000 machine is likely to break down just after the 2-year warranty expires and cost you upwards of £500 to repair. Your call") After all the hours wasted researching this fault, I decided to be polite but firm "Yes, every time. And I am well aware that this issue is due to a design fault common in Miele Washer-Driers, whereby soap powder congeals along the hot air system and cannot be cleaned out by the end-user, thus leading to issues with the safety thermostat and other parts." What was interesting was that as soon I said this, he did not faff around going off to 'ask his supervisor' or similar, but immediately booked the call. It is possible that he and other customer-facing colleagues know the issue with the washer-dryers, and so when confronted with someone who clearly knows it too, they give up trying to blind customers with science. Anyhow, the repair guy duly arrived and fortunately he was not a dud. He was excellent, very efficient, actually able to work on the machine at the same time as discussing it, and very loyal to the company (probably too loyal - he avoided giving too much away about these dryer issues when asked direct questions). I had been ready for an engineer who simply walked in, reset the thermostat and walked out - but as soon as he stepped through the door he said 'This will take about 2 hours', so I knew that either he was going to do a full dryer system clean out or parts replacement. Turned out to be the latter, i.e. he brought a top element box and fan, and a long plastic oblong duct thing, which I believe connects the heater to the suds container below? Pleased to say that when he took the various panels off, the machine itself inside looked very clean - which of course it should do after we have religiously bought and used all the various over-priced Miele de-lousers, and given the fact that it has probably only had the equivalent of 3-4 years use, if that. The key question - how the supposedly intelligent electronics could not detect that the heater was no longer heating and display an error code - was one he couldn't answer, or maybe preferred not to (I assume the real answer is along the lines of "yeah, I know people pay £2k for these machines, but the design guys don't think it worth putting in another temperature sensor that would pick up on the fact that no hot air is coming out during a drying cycle ..." As someone who generally respects German design, I was still intrigued as to whether this dryer failure issue was just a design flaw in my machine series and older, so asked if the drying system was the same in the new means. "Yes, fortunately!" he answered enthusiastically. This did perplex me a little - I can only assume that most repair guys take the view "sure, the system our machines use gets gunged up and conks even if you do use the RoF feature, but at the end of the day all we need to do is replace these two parts and it is rendered as good as new - and of course Miele customers can afford to pay, otherwise they would not be buying machines that are 2-3 times the price of the competition" A warning to anyone just about to purchase a new Miele washer/dryer I guess. Some might say that I am being a little harsh, but I know exactly how well cared for this machine has been, and how we have always used the RoF feature after every dry - so heaven help a harassed mum/dad with 4 kids and 12 wash/dries a week and no time to read the manual or use all the various Miele machine cleaning products. I'd have more respect for Miele if they took two simple steps - #1, move the Rinse Out Fluff instruction to page 1 of the manual or maybe #2 simply build a Rinse Out Fluff cycle into every drying cycle (you open the door, take the dried clothes out, slam the door, it RoFs and then turns off). While we are at it, maybe #3 - spend a Euro or two on putting another over-heat sensor near the heating element that gets gunged up, so that at least the machine gives a reliable error code - I never got the infamous '55' error displayed, which for all I know meant that the fan stopped working but the element was left getting hotter than a nuclear reaction inside my white box. BTW, out of interest, I downloaded the Manual for their newest, priciest washer-dryer, to see if it had been updated in anway - nope, same wishy-washy text re Rinse Out Fluff, buried deep in the centre. Fingers crossed that when ours goes again, it is in the week before the expiry of the warranty... Thanks to the various people here who contributed info that enabled me to talk knowledgeably to Service Centre and so secure a decent repair first time around. J For google: Miele washer dryer WT2780 WT 2780 drying problems issues cold air no 55 error message debris gunge white grey on clothes Waschtrockner lave-linge sechant
    2 points
  6. My washer door is the same with a broken door hinge lug. I drilled the tops off the heat moulded lug tops (careful not to drill into the inside cover. The cover came away with ease. I did not have time to source a new hinge so I drilled a 5.2mm hole thro the hinge (where the lug had broken) tapped it M6 and fitted a pan head bolt with the thread portion protruding outwards 9.5mm (locktighted the thread) . popped on the plastic cap after wrapping a little PTFE tape over the thread. To refit the hinge I needed to cut away thin portion of plastic webbing to clear the bolt head. Refitted the inner cover making sure the door latch was under the cover and drilled into retaining lugs with a 2mm diameter drill (not too deep). This is important to stop the lugs from splitting) I fixed the cover with thin wood screws and a washer. Success.
    2 points
  7. Have a Beko wdx8543130w washer/dryer, completely dead. Beko wanted either £130 minimum for a call out, or £174 for a years extended warranty. Followed the instructions as given in this thread, fitted a new diode, now works perfectly. Thank you very much to Bob and everyone else who has contributed to this forum. This is clearly a manufacturing fault that Beko are profiting hugely from, every time they replace a board, they are replacing it with the same type of faulty board that will break again! disgusting. Thanks again to everyone here, saving people thousands.
    2 points
  8. Hello Andy, Listen, I wanted to follow up with you regarding my problem as it is now fixed and maybe my information can help someone else. The wife wanted to buy a new machine but we can't afford the best part of 1000EU so after seeing how good a condition that machine was still in and not wanting to replace it I called Bosch. 99EU for them to look at it, if they repair it then the fee is waved. Anyway, it was to do with the incoming water. While the pressure was OK the flow rate was greatly restricted. As I didn't have the experience to know what was enough and what was not enough it didn't register with me that that was the problem I have attached the part that was replaced. It's a part I cleaned from underneath but didn't think the inside was all clogged up. Little did I know. Anyway, thanks again for all your help. Gary
    2 points
  9. Sorry for resurrecting an old thread but my own Serie 6 washer dryer stopped drying a couple of weeks ago and google brought me here. So, turns out the impeller was SERIOUSLY blocked and needed some TLC - the machine being only 2 years old. Rather than waste my time, I decided on some “user in-service modification” by removing an offending bit of metal from the back panel to enable the drier motor assembly to be removed fully (see attached pics). I achieved this with a trusty Dremel and cutting disk along the black pen line in the pic. Takes about 30mins to do, carefully. Make sure you pack around the area with tin foil to catch the sparks. Fan was completely clogged, as was some sort of sensor thingy just below it in the well. Helpful tip: when digging the fluff out the gaps, use a small flat-headed screwdriver, insert it between the blades from the outside, starting at the top and scrape down to the bottom, or vice versa. This picks all the fluff off the blade in one go. Don’t dig the fluff out at random as plenty sticks to the blades and is a PITA to tackle. And thus ends the tale of overcoming Bosch bad design - all for the cost of a new Dremel cutting wheel.
    2 points
  10. Control board is at the bottom-back - you access it by taking off the back panel. It also has a small ‘piggy-back’ board clipped onto it called ‘dryer unit’ Ive just sent my board to QER to see if there is anything they can fix, although there are a lot of small chips and surface mount components, so I’m not super hopeful, but worth a try. A new board from Bosch is £150 will update once I get feedback from QER
    2 points
  11. Hi Simon Can't tell you offhand what the rating is as you need the number to cross reference it, to do that you will have to desolder one leg and lift it up, then google the number. If you are getting iffy readings on D6 it might be because D7 is faulty and affecting the readings on D6 (as it did for me). You can only confirm a diode is definitely faulty by desoldering one leg and testing as the circuit can have adverse affects on the readings (eg:- the meter reads through other components when in circuit). You only get a good idea if it reads 0 ohms both ways when in circuit. I would suggest desoldering D7 and then check D6 as the readings were more in line with a good diode on D6. Regards Rob
    2 points
  12. Looks like we've had a bit of a run on this problem, 7 since Christmas. I have emailed Beko again, not holding my breath though, watch this space. Still very happy it is helping though. Regards Rob
    2 points
  13. Happy my post is still helping people, but cannot stress enough don't do it if you are not confident and always remove the power by unplugging, as this test can and must be performed without power. Maybe this posting will eventually leak back to BEKO. To member "Beko", your name did confuse me slightly as I thought BEKO were thanking me (very unlikely). bob12241
    2 points
  14. Bob12241 you are a superstar! Same failure with my machine at a mere 18 months old. Like yourself, I'm not intimidated by the words "No user serviceable parts inside" but upon examination I couldn't find any obvious scorch marks that would indicate a failed component. As I live on a boat where the power is kinda dirty I assumed that the IC had failed from one too many surges or brown outs or that I had been merely unlucky since nobody else seemed to have experienced the same failure. Currys wanted me to get an engineer in to certify the machine was broken before they'd send another one out to repair the machine - they said they'd pay for the engineer call out but the consequential loss of earnings from spending two days at home waiting for engineers was greater than the price I paid for the machine in the first place, not to mention the fuel for the 40 mile round trip to Mum's to do laundry while I waited for this glacial repair programme to execute. So I ordered a new brain from Beko and fitted it myself - problem solved until last week when it happened again! This time round your magical, actual fix was now on the interwebs. I ordered a new diode which I have just fitted and now my machine is happily gurgling away in the corner. The saga will not end here. I shall be writing a stern letter to Beko demanding a refund for the board which evidently was just as defective as that originally installed in the machine. Another shall be going to Currys berating them for their ridiculous repair procedure and also informing them that this is now a known fault with this model of machine. I'll be demanding compensation for the time I've had to invest in fixing what should have been their responsibility - well if you don't ask you don't get. All the best and Merry Christmas! Driftpin.
    2 points
  15. Not sure what happened there, tried attaching a pic to this post and it only posted the pic. HI. I bought a new spider arm and new bearings, even though they both looked fine, as I couldn't see what else it could possibly be. however on stripping the machine down, when I removed the motor, I discovered two of the rubbers that hold the motor to the drum, had disintegrated. With the motor in place, I couldn't see this, I suspect that was the problem, hence at slow speeds the motor wasn't rocking but was at faster speeds. The spares companies and Samsung (emailed them to check) do not sell these rubbers separate from the motor (complete con), they probably come in a box of 500 for about £5. I read on a forum somewhere about someone having Samsung out under the warranty and they replaced them so they must have them as spares. I bought a couple of round rubbers at a local motor factors that were similar in size, fixed them to my drill by putting a bolt through them, then turned the drill on and held it against a belt sender, that sanded them down, keeping them perfectly round. It was a struggle getting them into the holes (used washing up liquid and brute force) Machines been perfect since, and I honestly think I wasted money replacing bearings and spider arm, I suspect the rubber on the motor was the cause all along. I would remove your motor and check the rubbers before doing anything else. Attached a pic showing the rubber in the motor. The red arrows point to one washer going through the motor bracket, when I removed the bolts, instead of the rubber going right through, all I had was what looked like two round washers as the inside had totally turned to dust. So you can look at it without removing the bolts and it looks like the rubbers fine as you still see both sides, it's not until the bolts are removed that you see the middles turned to dust. Hope that's of some use. The spider arm cost me £85 delivered, I got the bearings at a local bearing company for about £7 (instead of the £25+ the washing machine spares companies wanted online) , and I bought a new bearing seal seal for £16 delivered, my thinking being it should now last me many more years. I had to take the plastic drum apart to do this, and while the seal between the two halves looked fine, I also spent about £5 on sealant that I put over the seal to make sure I had a water tight drum. In addition to this I had to buy thread locker for another £7 (got the one in a lipstick kind of dispenser so ave loads left for another use) and had to give my local exhaust place a drink for them removing the nut holding the spider arm on with their air tools as I couldn't budge it So I ended up spending about £135 on parts, plus an annoying £12 on phone calls to Espares (they said it was 5p a min, not sure how it worked out at £12, but I'm not alone in being hacked off at this, wasn't going to phone them to argue). My presumption being that hopefully the machine lasts just as long again. But again I THINK I wasted most of it and all I needed to do was replace the motor rubbers. Note, most, if not all the internet spares companies are the same company under many different names. I phoned three times, once to enquire about the spider arm and once to enquire about the rubber for the motors. . Once I was was cut off wile on hold, hence my 3 calls. I was not impressed to find the calls cost me £12, so I wouldn't recommend phoning them under any circumstance.
    2 points
  16. Many thanks for your reply, Andy. The problem has been resolved itself now without the need for an engineer's visit. The temperature in the kitchen is cold at 14 degrees. We have run three more 90 degree washes with the load being fuller each time and have observed the steam and condensation produced being less each time. As mentioned previously the apparent problem was initially when the installation engineer telling us to run a cleaning 90 degree wash on an empty load which produced considerable amounts of steam and condensate. Running a full load at 90 degrees still does result in much less steam being produced with a few drops of condensation from the bottom of the soap drawer. I think we can live with this. Thanks again for all your help. William
    2 points
  17. Thank you. I have rather a lot of laundry to do so can now get stuck in
    2 points
  18. Yes. It will just heat it up as needed. If it’s a hot and cold fill washing machine then as long as water is connected and able to go into the hot water hose and valve it doesn’t matter if it’s hot or cold.
    2 points
  19. Thanks for your reply, I think you are correct. I have checked to ensure that there no blockages from the pump all the way to the drain and capped off the tube. We did two loads of washing and had no problems with the machine draining or water coming out of the drain hose.
    2 points
  20. I applaud what they're doing. Their survival probably depends on being realistic about who their target market is, and I hope there's a decent pocket of consumers looking for aspects such as repairability and not shipping a washing machine across the globe every 3 years, and have the cash to pay the higher wages of say the UK vs China. It's interesting that they started selling the machines via local retailers first, which sounds like a smart way of ensuring a controlled growth and ironing out any issues with the production process. I'm almost too young for the days you guys speak about (though I picked a lot of computers out of skips) and whilst those days are gone and the future will be different, it won't necessarily be worse if we don't want it to be. The web means it's never been easier to seek out like minded people or products that actually fit the bill, whereas previously our choice would have been mainly limited to a local shop. 3D printing of parts will be the next disruption and it seems the "throw away" ethos of the current manufacturers is woefully prepared for that. Recently I discovered the "buy it for life" group on Reddit which is interesting if you haven't seen it. So with any luck, such a company as Ebac doesn't need a massive market to survive if it can target the right people (though I'm extrapolating quite a lot in this about the ethos behind Ebac -- it could be it's solely "buy British")
    2 points
  21. Please let us know how it goes. It will be useful for advising other people in the future.
    2 points
  22. Hello Andy, Thank you so much for replying. I'm really not happy with it because as you say there is a far bigger chance of things going down that gap and the possible extra wear and tear on the bearings, (which is what my 8 yr old Candy has just died of and this is the replacement) I will try your suggestion and see what happens. I have messaged Electrolux on their site contact form, I can't find an email for them so can't add the link, but hoping they will reply soon.
    2 points
  23. Hello Nikki. Yes that does look a fair bit eliptical. If it isn't catching on the door seal it's difficult to know if the manufacturer would accept it as a fault or not though. The problem with it being eliptical like that is the potential for vibration on spin as the drum rim is out of true, and potential for things to get trapped in the gap that opens and closes as the drum revolves. Few drums are perfectly round at the rim and I've seen a lot out of true like that. Try putting it on spin with no laundry inside. Does it vibrate much on top speed? If it does you could try complaining. You could also try sending a link to the video to the manufacturer to see if they accept if it is normal or not.
    2 points
  24. Dear Andy, Thanks for your reply and the links that you supplied. Very helpful and totally answered my question. Cheers Ray Purchase
    2 points
  25. does this look like your existing brush? http://www.4washerhelp.co.uk/indesit/widxl146/carbon-brush/catalogue.pl?path=495970:599890,52691:495982&model_ref=10789130&refine=carbon%20brush
    2 points
  26. I had this exact same problem with the same model of washing machine, and after seeing this post yesterday, I decided to investigate. This machine has a drain pump and a circulation pump which sit either side of the pump housing, but the pumps are identical. The machine only made a grinding noise during wash, not draining, so I was pretty sure it was the circulation side that was the issue. After removing it and testing it, it worked flawlessly, but it was pretty clear that the black pipe running to the top of the rubber seal on the drum was blocked (I couldn't blow through it). We live in a very hard water area, and the pipe is quite narrow and was blocked with scale. After squeezing it to break the scale up, and blowing as much as possible out, it became clear, and after reassembling it, no more grinding!
    2 points
  27. Hi yes, I just replaced the pump & housing
    2 points
  28. Hi. Bosch don't produce anywhere near as high quality appliances that they used to in the 70s, 80s and possibly 90s. Some of their base models now are very cheap. However, they have a very good reputation with Which? for reliability and value for money.
    1 point
  29. Let us know how you get on please.
    1 point
  30. Fixed!.... I decided to take a gamble and order a new Washing Machine PCB Board, this is a black box of tricks that is connected directly too and runs the motor. One thing I noticed with the defective PCB Board is that when I span the motor spindle by hand it offered some resistance but if I unplugged it from the board it rotated freely, however with the new board fitted and plugged in the spindle span freely..perhaps a useful test? Fitting the new PCB board was simple just 2 screws and 4 plugs but at a cost of £100 ..was intending to send it back if it didn't work.
    1 point
  31. Hi Andy. For me washing machines are just too functional and unreliable, and don't last long enough to justify spending obscene amounts on one
    1 point
  32. Hi Andy, Update: I ordered 2 new brushes and when I got home tonight and when I opened up and looked in the machine I realised they are very similar but the incorrect part. I did however notice that out of the 2 brushes only one of them were connecting with the armature. I removed the one that was not touching and the carbon popped out futher which then allowed me to reseat and have both brushes now touching the armature. I can a wash with a few shirts in an it run perfect. I then ran with more of a half load and it run for 30 mins untill it came to a stop after struggling to turn the drum on one occasion. However, when I paused the machine and then pressed again to unpause - the machine turned over and carried on and completed the cycle. I ran again with low load and it completed with no issues. I ran for a 4th cycle half full and this time it stopped on 3 occasions over the 52mins, each time starting again fine after I paused and then unpaused the cycle. Thoughts? I am still going to get the correct bushes and fit BTW.
    1 point
  33. Whirlpool has issued a recall notice on some of its models of washing machines due to a potential safety concern. It affects certain models of Hotpoint and Indesit washing machines made between October 2014 and 2018 and it is feared more than 11,000 machines in UK & Ireland may be impacted. A flaw with the door-locking system may lead them to overheat and potentially catch fire. Whirpool launched an urgent recall of certain models of tumble dryers over fire safety fears in July of this year. If you think your washing machine might be affected, you can check by calling 0800 316 1442 or by visiting https://washingmachinerecall.whirlpool.co.uk Here is a full list of the models involved in the Whirlpool recall of fire-risk Hotpoint and Indesit branded washing machines. The models are listed by their commercial code, followed by the brand name. FML 742P UK Hotpoint WMAOD 743G UK Hotpoint WMAOD 743P UK Hotpoint WMAQB 721P UK.M Hotpoint WMAQC 641P UK.M Hotpoint WMAQC 741G UK Hotpoint WMAQC 741P UK Hotpoint WMAQC 741P UK.M Hotpoint WMAQF 621G UK Hotpoint WMAQF 621P UK Hotpoint WMAQF 641 P UK.M Hotpoint WMAQF 721G UK Hotpoint WMAQF 721P UK.M Hotpoint WMAQL 621G UK Hotpoint WMBF 742G UK Hotpoint WMBF 742K UK Hotpoint WMBF 742P UK Hotpoint WMBF 742P UK.M Hotpoint WMBF 763P UK Hotpoint WMEF 722 BC UK Hotpoint WMEF 742 P UK Hotpoint WMEUF 722P UK Hotpoint WMEUF 743G UK Hotpoint WMEUF 743P UK Hotpoint WMFG 741P UK Hotpoint WMFG 741P UK.M Hotpoint WMFUG 742 P UK.M Hotpoint WMFUG 742G UK Hotpoint WMFUG 742P UK Hotpoint WMFUG 842P UK.M Hotpoint WMJLF 842P UK Hotpoint WMJLL 742P UK Hotpoint WMSAQG 621P UK Hotpoint WMXTF 742G UK Hotpoint WMXTF 742K UK Hotpoint WMXTF 742P UK Hotpoint WMXTF 742P UK.M Hotpoint WMXTF 842P UK.M Hotpoint WMYL 7151PS UK Hotpoint XWA 81252X K UK Indesit XWA 81252X W UK Indesit XWD 71452X K UK Indesit
    1 point
  34. Mine is now doing this too. No error messages.. had it years and it has never done it before.. but it is beeping during the wash cycle.. I have run a cleaner through it and it seems to have stopped ?? Will see.. Did anyone ever get to the bottom of it ?
    1 point
  35. Check the drum pulley isn’t slightly loose. Check the condition of the belt too as they can cause funny noises. Take the belt off and spin the drum by hand from the front. Turn it slowly and lift it all the way round its circumference to feel if the drum has more give at any point indicating a possible problem with the drum spider.
    1 point
  36. Hello. The leak could be running down from the back of the door seal or it could be coming from the plastic outer drum. You'd need to physically investigate and probably take off the front panel if it comes off. If the drum has gone it may well be expensive.
    1 point
  37. Thanks for the advice Andy. I took another look before I read what you had written. I found that the top two bolts were still in place but the bottom two had fallen out. I did as you mentioned and removed the concrete block completely and discovered that the very bottom hole was completely closed up. Whether it had always been like that I could not say but I'm sure that when I replaced the bolts yesterday that it didn't go into the thread but down the side, that's why I thought the thread had gone when I was tightening it. I suspect that it could have come out of the factory that way. I've now opened up the hole on the drum casing and screwed it in properly. There's a little split to the one plastic hole just above the bottom one but the bolt screws in tight and the concrete block itself seems to be in very good condition. So it's all back together although I have not tested it yet. I was quite conscious about not over tightening as you say. Like you I have used a rachet until the end where I have switched to a screwdriver handle with less leverage for the final tightening. You mention that it may be an idea to replace the bolts themselves? The threads seem just fine on them, they have a washer but there's no locking part on these that I can see. Thanks, Matt
    1 point
  38. The Problem Washing Machine: Hoover PE235 1300 Special Edition Problem: washing machine not emptying water Analysis: Filter had some rug threads but problem remained after filter was cleared. After 70% of the water has been manually emptied, the washing machine will spin and empty. This indicates the pump is working. Diagnosis: There is a blockage somewhere but it is not obvious where. Next Steps: Looked online and found this really helpful website The Solution A BIG THANK YOU to Andy at WasherHelp for his instructions on diagnosing the problem on a washing machine that won't drain water I would normally have given up having checked the filter accessible behind the front kickplate. However, his article gave me the knowledge and confidence to remove the back plate and quickly identify there was a blockage in the sump pipe. Access was difficult with the washing machine upright so I followed the advice to tilt the machine onto its front and not onto its side to get better access to the pump. I carefully placed the machine on its front. I then removed the holding clip and detached the hose. I then pulled out of the pipe the remnants of a moulting rug my wife has inadvisedly washed. The wet blob of tangled threads the size of a table tennis ball, more than enough to block the pipe. I attqched the hose fixed the spring clip with some difficulty. I righted the machine, screwed on the backplate, and put on a new washing load. And then, of course, I accusingly presented the ball of damp rug remnants to my wife. She now owes me one. Thanks again Andy for the great advice on this site.
    1 point
  39. Thanks for that. I came to the conclusion the code meant little. I've had S/H parts from Ebay so little expense incurred yet. I'll post again if I find it - it's a challenge.
    1 point
  40. Hello there, I've had my Speed Queen for around 27 years, and she's only now started to give me problems. I've got the local repairman to give me a quote and he told me the following parts need to be replaced: Seal and hub kit; Top bearing; Bottom bearing; Belt; 2-double-hole brakes Given the washing machine's age, is it better to replace rather than repair? Also, the cost of the repair will come out to the same as cheaper top loader model. Many thanks for this wonderful forum!
    1 point
  41. Hello Andy. Thanks for the informative post. I caught your reply by sheer chance today. I've finally been refunded for the Kenwood and LG machines I purchased. However, I've been left with a massive phone bill thanks to amount of calls I had to make to the Currys Team KnowHow helpline. I only make about a tenner's worth of calls per quarter, but my next bill is going to be about £130 in calls plus BT's line rental charge. I'm going to try to claw some of it back from Currys. I don't whether it's even possible, but I'm going to try. I ended up seeing my GP because of the stress of having to make so many calls (with a minimum 25 minute hold time) and repeatedly dealing with such poor service. The whole thing has put me off Currys for life. The new Bosch installed by John Lewis seems to be working well. It completes the cycles, and it is incredibly stable when it spins up. There is a small problem I've noticed: when ever I hit the start/pause button to start the Cotton wash cycle it pauses instead of starting instantly. Only when I press it a second time, does the programme begin. These new VarioPerfect Serie 4 Bosches have touchpads, so perhaps it's a little too sensitive. I can live with it (the machine works perfectly in every other aspect), but after everything that's happened, I have started thinking about it. I was completely unaware about the situation regarding fridges. I still think LG is talking nonsense when it comes to their DirectDrive machines. My flat is on the second floor and was built after the second world war - it's not a new build luxury apartment or anything. The floor is definitely concrete - and as you say there must be millions of flats like mine in England. I think they class it as a suspended floor simply because the home isn't on the ground. It's ridiculous that LG would design a machine that excludes so many households. It's just doesn't make much sense. Looking back, I really think the vibration issue I had must have been down to an internal fault or incorrect levelling. This Bosch is rock solid when spinning at 1200rpm with a full load of washing. As you say the direct drive design should result in a more stable washer. One thing I instantly noticed about the LG was how plasticky the chassis was. It did not feel like a chassis from a machine that usually retails for £550. The unit's plastic case would creak, even under slower drum motions. And the tinted door was very light in terms of weight and finish. Perhaps the poor plastic chassis played a part in amplifying the vibrations. I'm just happy it is gone. I just hope it's third time lucky with this Bosch. A couple of weeks in, and apart from that small issue with the start button, it seems to be working well so far.
    1 point
  42. I found a broken cable on motor, simple fix. its the second time this has happened
    1 point
  43. Ok, an update. I wasn't able to unblock it with my dads pipe cleaner, so I had to take the back & top cover off & unclip the control panel. Then I was able to unclip the 2 fill hoses & the 2(?) drain hoses. The main drain hose underneath the soap draw was blocked solid near the top! God knows how as it's over 1" diameter! Btw this rubber drain hose has a U-bend in it, so I wouldn't have got far with the pipe cleaner, that said the blockage was in the straight part leading to it. Anyway I pulled the drain hose out from the drum casing & emptied it out into the sink. Beneath the blockage a load of bone dry washing powder fell out! How the hell could it have got there? And the blockage turned out to be a large plug of solidified washing powder! (looked new) Again, how??? I noticed in the soap draw that the powder from the aborted wash (which had got partially wet) had partially solidified too, I had to break it up to get it out. The powder is nothing unusual, it's just Daz Whites & Colours. So I assume that would happen with any washing powder? So although I have got my washing machine going again (thank god! lol), I am mystified as to how & why dry washing powder got into the drain hose along with just enough water to dampen it but not flush it through (I assume). I'm worried that this could happen again. Can anyone tell me how this could have happened? Cheers Mark
    1 point
  44. Thanks for your reply Andy. I know it is hard to understand what I mean by motor chamber, at least it would be for me because I have never seen an electric pump designed like these before. I wish I had videoed the repair from start to finish because I couldn't find anything like it on youtube. All the youtubers just threw out the pumps, didn't dismantle them. Anyway after cleaning mine out I re-used them. The bearing is only plastic bush on steel spindle. And indeed this is all that would keep the water out, no additional seal. To describe the pumps a little more, there is an impeller chamber as expected, then there is a plastic disk (with the spindle passing through), on the other side a cylindrical chamber for the permanent magnet rotor, around that there is another chamber with nothing much in it (except crud!). The stator is a coil wound around and through the assembly. The stator does not come in contact with the water/crud inside the 2 motor chambers. Having considered it I am pretty sure the motor chambers are supposed to fill with water and this helps lubricate the bearing as well as cool the motor.Anyway if they fail again, which they probably will, I will video the repair. A new pair would be about £90. Apart from interest, the reasons I overhauled the pumps instead of replacing them are: speed to get washing again, risk of buying pumps that are not compatible (hassle) and cost.
    1 point
  45. Re: Samsung machines. I'm personally not a fan. Their "ecobubble" technology is actually a very old idea - using high suds to wash away dirt. That's what twin tubs used to do. However, modern detergents are purposely low-sudsing for automatic machines, so designed to be dissolved in water, not foamed up. Excessive foam in a washing machine just makes rinsing more difficult, so if you have anyone in your household with sensitive skin or any kind of skin condition, they're probably not the best choice of washer to go for.
    1 point
  46. Hi there, The programs marked in yellow at cottons, the programs marked in green are synthetics and the programs in pink are special programs. 1. Cottons 90 with prewash 2. Cottons 90 3. Cottons 60 4. Cottons 40 5. Rinses 6. Special treatments (this is where the softener is added, but it can also be used to add bleach. Not used much these days) 7. Full Spin 8. Synthetics 60 with prewash 9. Synthetics 60 10. Synthetics 40 11. Rinses 12. Special treatments 13. Short Spin 14. Freshen Up 35, by the looks of it, but can't confirm. Not sure about 15 & 16. They look the same as some of the synethetics cycle, but it doesn't make sense to have 2 cycles exactly the same, so I'll leave those. The first button on the left is for full or half spin (800 being full, 550 being half), then heavy soil, then no spin and finally half load on the end. This machine is a washer-dryer, so it looks like the middle dial is the timer for the dryer function. Not sure how to active the drying cycle, but possibly that's what program 16 does? So, for a standard cottons 40 cycle, you'd want program 4, the temperature dial at 40 and then press start. For a full spin on it's own, you want program 7.
    1 point
  47. I wouldn't touch anything made by Hoover/Candy or Hotpoint/Indesit with a barge pole. If I was on a budget and buying a new machine, I'd get a mid-high end Beko for between £250 and £350. Miele, Beko, Bosch/Siemens and (at a push) AEG are the only brands I'd consider owning. I agree with your point above, Andy. Quick washing does not wash effectively. And not to be rude, but anybody who washes bedding, towels or underwear on a quick wash really needs to rethink their washing habbits.
    1 point
  48. I have the wm52, and I can confirm that the timer does do that if you disconnect the motor. Another thing is if the element blows, the timer stops while waiting for the temperature to rise, but of course it never does.
    1 point
  49. Andy, Wife used machine this aft, all ok. Water getting to temp. Had to take brushes off tonight to take a pic of them as struggling to locate correct items. Put back together run another wash, again all ok. Not much meat left on the brushes, can send photos if you want. I will keep you posted to assist others as it is frustrating when all you want to know is what the code means so you can fix it or scrap it! Cheers
    1 point

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