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Distilled Water In My Washing Machine


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#1 bruno22rf

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 09:45 PM

I live in a hard water area so was wondering if I could use the water from my (condenser) tumble dryer in my washing machine-if so could I simply pour it into the soap tray as the machine fills?-how does my washing machine determine the water level?

 

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#2 Washerhelp_Whitegoodshelp

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 02:41 PM

No it would be impossible to use that way unless you had several gallons of it and were prepared to stand by the washing machine pouring it in several times.

#3 bruno22rf

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 11:12 PM

Our tumble dryer puts out about a gallon every 2 cycles-the idea is to pour the water into the soap dispenser as the washing machine fills-must be better than just tipping it down the sink?-i'm just wondering how the washing machine determines its water level-would adding water at the dispenser over fill the drum or does the machine detect the level of water as it fills?

#4 Washerhelp_Whitegoodshelp

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 04:02 PM

I must confess that whilst what you are proposing has environmental merits it seems completely unworkable in practice. You would have to stand by the washing machine most of the time it was washing and rinsing and wouldn't be able to easily know when it has enough water in. You could as a compromise put the distilled water in at the beginning of the wash and then leave it to take normal water in on rinses.

In order to put the correct amount in though you'd need to turn off the water supply to the machine and carefully listen at the back or feel the hose or valve to know when the water valve is energised, then slowly pour water into the drawer whilst monitoring the valve and stopping when the valve stops humming or you can feel the valve has stopped being energised if that's possible. Even then, when the washing machine starts to wash, for a few minutes after the washer may want to top up with extra water as water is absorbed by the laundry especially with cottons.

After doing that you;d need to remember to turn the water back on - or come back in half an hour to an hour and repeat the process several times through the rinses. The whole thing would be a considerable faff. Maybe you could use some of the water on the garden or something?

#5 bruno22rf

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Posted 08 July 2012 - 07:31 AM

Been doing it for 2 days now-its no bother-we normally reload both the washing machine and the dryer at the same time-I simply remove the dryer tank and pour the water into the soap tray as the washing machine fills-the warm water seems to flush the liquid detergent away better than cold water alone.Takes less than 30 seconds and must be better than throwing the water away surely?

#6 Washerhelp_Whitegoodshelp

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 10:56 AM

Yes, do you allow it to rinse normally though? My point has always been that to use the water for all the washing machine's requirements would seem a little obsessive and extremely inconvenient. But just using some on the initial fill shouldn't be much trouble.




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